Friday, May 30, 2014

Resources for May 30, 2014

"If you're not angry, you're either a stone... or you're too sick to be angry." - Maya Angelou



"End Mass Incarceration Now!" The New York Times (May 25, 2014)

Center for Constitutional Rights: "Iraq Veterans Against the War has released The Fort Hood Report, a snapshot in time of the largest Army post in the country, from the height of its deployment cycle to the recent drawdown. It includes 31 in-depth testimonials from Fort Hood veterans, soldiers and family members who lived through the trauma of that time. Read their stories here."

Johnson, Nicholas. "Negroes and the Gun." After Words (January 18, 2014) ["Fordham Law School Professor Nicholas Johnson talks about his book, [Negroes and the Gun], in which he argues that there is an unreported tradition of African Americans using firearms to defend their families and communities."]


Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Resources for May 25, 2014

Resources for May 27, 2014


“This is the only story of mine whose moral I know. I don’t think it’s a marvelous moral; I simply happen to know what it is: We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” -- Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night (1961)

Nocera, Joe. "Holiday Weekend Gun Report: May 23-26, 2014." The New York Times (May 27, 2014)



bricolage \bree-koh-LAHZH\

noun: construction (as of a sculpture or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand; also : something constructed in this way

EXAMPLES

Knowing that the motor was assembled from a hasty bricolage of junk parts, Raphael had little hope that it would run effectively.

"Hustad reconstructs the past through a bricolage of interviews, letters, newspaper articles, Bible verses, prayers and anecdotes…." — From a book review by Justin St. Germain in The New York Times, March 23, 2014

According to French social anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, the artist "shapes the beautiful and useful out of the dump heap of human life." Lévi-Strauss compared this artistic process to the work of a handyman who solves technical or mechanical problems with whatever materials are available. He referred to that process of making do as "bricolage," a term derived from the French verb "bricoler" (meaning "to putter about") and related to "bricoleur," the French name for a jack-of-all-trades. "Bricolage" made its way from French to English during the 1960s, and it is now used for everything from the creative uses of leftovers ("culinary bricolage") to the cobbling together of disparate computer parts ("technical bricolage").

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