Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Embodied Films

Sensory Scenes: Opening of Apocalypse Now Opening of Gangs of New York/sound effects of Jaws and Friday the 13th and The Exorcist Blue -- musical sensory moments Opening of Blue Velvet Tracking shot in Code Unknown Tracking shot of high school entrance in Donnie Darko Opening scene of Goodfellas, the tracking shot of the first date, the paranoia at the end The Matrix -- the removal of the jack, the training, and the interrogation of morpheus Illness: A Beautiful Mind Contagion Sexuality: Before Sunrise Blue is the Warmest Color A Dangerous Method Harold and Maude The Night Porter Nymphomaniac Rust and Bone Shortbus Criminality: A Clockwork Orange Gomorrah Truth/Authenticity: Fog of War The Thin Blue Line Identity/Memory: 2001: A Space Odyssey Adaptation Bladerunner Being John Malkovich Dogtooth Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Even the Rain Grizzly Man Her Human Nature Hunger La' Commune Let the Right One In (Ideological Becoming) Body: 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days Bamboozled (guide in gmail) Boys Don't Cry (guide in gmail) Gattica (Eugenics lecture in Gmail) Human Nature Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Violence: The Act of Killing The Addiction (Presentation in Gmail) The Battle of Algiers Cache City of God City of Life and Death Demonlover (Global flows of capitalism) Do the Right Thing (Discursive violence as a prelude to physical violence) Funny Games Hostel Jarhead Night and Fog The Passion of the Christ Salo Saw Standard Operating Procedure (emphasis on the mediated representation) Tarantino films Zero Dark Thirty Environment: Exit Through the Gift Shop Slam

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Mexican Feast

Chipolte Peach Salsa

Smoky Pork Tinga (Mexican Everyday Cookbook pg 191-193)

Grilled Chicken Thighs and Breasts with Yucatecan Spices (Mexican Everyday Cookbook pg 171-173)

Roasted Fresh Chile Salsa (Mexican Everyday pg 158-159)

Barbacoa (Shredded Beef) (The Mexican Slow Cooker pg 97)

Yucatan Shrimp Tacos


Rocket Fuel salsa




Spicy Fish Tacos w/ Cabbage Slaw Lime Crema [or Killer Fish Tacos ]

Margaritas http://www.afamilyfeast.com/margaritas/ Guacamole http://www.afamilyfeast.com/guacamole/ Salsa http://www.afamilyfeast.com/salsa/ Mango Cilantro Mojitos http://ahouseinthehills.com/2014/07/07/mango-cilantro-mojitos/ Watermelon Salad

Friday, May 30, 2014

Resources for May 30, 2014

"If you're not angry, you're either a stone... or you're too sick to be angry." - Maya Angelou



"End Mass Incarceration Now!" The New York Times (May 25, 2014)

Center for Constitutional Rights: "Iraq Veterans Against the War has released The Fort Hood Report, a snapshot in time of the largest Army post in the country, from the height of its deployment cycle to the recent drawdown. It includes 31 in-depth testimonials from Fort Hood veterans, soldiers and family members who lived through the trauma of that time. Read their stories here."

Johnson, Nicholas. "Negroes and the Gun." After Words (January 18, 2014) ["Fordham Law School Professor Nicholas Johnson talks about his book, [Negroes and the Gun], in which he argues that there is an unreported tradition of African Americans using firearms to defend their families and communities."]


Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Resources for May 25, 2014

Resources for May 27, 2014


“This is the only story of mine whose moral I know. I don’t think it’s a marvelous moral; I simply happen to know what it is: We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” -- Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night (1961)

Nocera, Joe. "Holiday Weekend Gun Report: May 23-26, 2014." The New York Times (May 27, 2014)



bricolage \bree-koh-LAHZH\

noun: construction (as of a sculpture or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand; also : something constructed in this way

EXAMPLES

Knowing that the motor was assembled from a hasty bricolage of junk parts, Raphael had little hope that it would run effectively.

"Hustad reconstructs the past through a bricolage of interviews, letters, newspaper articles, Bible verses, prayers and anecdotes…." — From a book review by Justin St. Germain in The New York Times, March 23, 2014

According to French social anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, the artist "shapes the beautiful and useful out of the dump heap of human life." Lévi-Strauss compared this artistic process to the work of a handyman who solves technical or mechanical problems with whatever materials are available. He referred to that process of making do as "bricolage," a term derived from the French verb "bricoler" (meaning "to putter about") and related to "bricoleur," the French name for a jack-of-all-trades. "Bricolage" made its way from French to English during the 1960s, and it is now used for everything from the creative uses of leftovers ("culinary bricolage") to the cobbling together of disparate computer parts ("technical bricolage").

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Resources for May 22, 2014

Bergen, Benjamin K. "The New Science of Meaning." Huffington Post (December 11, 2012)





Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Resources for May 16, 2014

Resources for May 21, 2014


Morgan, James. "'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered." BBC (May 16, 2014)

Rich, Nathaniel. "Authenticity All Right: Lee Friedlander’s New Orleans." New York Review of Books (May 16, 2014)


“What is the purpose of writing music? One is, of course, not dealing with purposes but dealing with sounds. Or the answer must take the form of a paradox: a purposeful purposeless or a purposeless play. This play, however, is an affirmation of life--not an attempt to bring order out of chaos nor to suggest improvements in creation, but simply a way of waking up to the very life we’re living, which is so excellent once one gets one’s mind and one’s desires out of its way and lets it act of its own accord.” ― John Cage, Silence: Lectures and Writings (1961)

"There are two parts to the human dilemma. One is the belief that the end justifies the means. That push-button philosophy, that deliberate deafness to suffering has become the monster in the war machine. The other is the betrayal of the human spirit. The assertion of dogma closes the mind and turns a nation, a civilization into a regiment of ghosts — obedient ghosts, or tortured ghosts." -- Jacob Bronowski, Ascent of Man (1973)


Gottschalk, Peter. "American Heretics: Catholics, Jews, Muslims and the History of Religious Intolerance." After Words (December 28, 2013) ["Peter Gottschalk talks about his book, American Heretics: Catholics, Jews, Muslims and the History of Religious Intolerance, in which he argues that religious intolerance has been strong in America since the middle of the nineteenth century."]

Levin, Yuval. "The Great Debate." After Words (January 4, 2014) ["Yuval Levin, founder and editor of National Affairs, talks about his book, The Great Debate, in which he discusses the origin of the political Left-Right divide, arguing that today's partisanship began with the debates over the French Revolution."]

Friday, May 16, 2014

Resources for May 16, 2014




Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Resources for May 12, 2014

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Sweden: Göran Olsson, 2011)

House, Silas. "Beshear lawsuit embarrasses state, tarnishes his legacy; Backward thinking on Ky.'s gay-marriage ban." Lexington Herald-Leader (May 13, 2014)

Roy, Arundhati. "Capitalism: A Ghost Story" We Are Many (March 26, 2014 at The New School in NYC) ["From the poisoned rivers, barren wells, and clear-cut forests, to the hundreds of thousands of farmers who have committed suicide to escape punishing debt, to the hundreds of millions of people who live on less than two dollars a day, there are ghosts nearly everywhere you look in India. India is a nation of 1.2 billion, but the country’s 100 richest people own assets equivalent to one-fourth of India’s gross domestic product. Capitalism: A Ghost Story examines the dark side of democracy in contemporary India, and shows how the demands of globalized capitalism has subjugated billions of people to the highest and most intense forms of racism and exploitation."]

Drone Survival Guide [Website: "Our ancestors could spot natural predators from far by their silhouettes. Are we equally aware of the predators in the present-day? Drones are remote-controlled planes that can be used for anything from surveillance and deadly force, to rescue operations and scientific research. Most drones are used today by military powers for remote-controlled surveillance and attack, and their numbers are growing. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicted in 2012 that within 20 years there could be as many as 30.000 drones flying over U.S. Soil alone. As robotic birds will become commonplace in the near future, we should be prepared to identify them. This survival guide is an attempt to familiarise ourselves and future generations, with a changing technological environment. This document contains the silhouettes of the most common drone species used today and in the near future. Each indicating nationality and whether they are used for surveillance only or for deadly force. All drones are drawn in scale for size indication. From the smallest consumer drones measuring less than 1 meter, up to the Global Hawk measuring 39,9 meter in length."]

Crockford, Kade. "San Francisco Woman Pulled Out of Car at Gunpoint Because of License Plate Reader Error." Free Future (May 13, 2014)





Angier, Natalie. "Abstract Thoughts? The Body Takes Them Literally." The New York Times (February 2, 2010)


Merriam-Webster Word-of-the-Day

eidetic \eye-DET-ik\

adjective: marked by or involving extraordinarily accurate and vivid recall especially of visual images

EXAMPLES

Thanks to her eidetic memory, Kirsten was able to recall every last detail of what happened that night, including the colors of each person's outfit.

"Jason Bateman, making his feature directing debut after directing episodes of his 'Arrested Development' series, plays an adult who uses a loophole to enter a spelling bee and whose eidetic memory all but guarantees he will win if he chooses." — From a movie review by Duane Dudek in the Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee), March 27, 2014

Friday, May 09, 2014

Resources for May 9, 2014




Holland, Joshua. "A Primer: Just What Is Net Neutrality — and Why All the Fuss?" Moyers & Co (May 2, 2014)

Watts, Jonathan. "Uruguay's president José Mujica: no palace, no motorcade, no frills." The Guardian (December 13, 2013)

Dialogic Cinephilia archive: The Square (Egypt/USA: Jehane Noujaim, 2013)

Constantino, Bobby. "I Got Myself Arrested So I Could Look Inside the Justice System: A former prosecutor fights the law and lets it win." The Atlantic (December 17, 2013)

Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day

Brown, Ellen. "Robbing Main Street to Prop Up Wall Street: Why Jerry Brown's Rainy Day Fund Is a Bad Idea for California." TruthOut (May 7, 2014)["There is no need to sequester funds urgently needed by Main Street to pay for Wall Street's malfeasance. Californians can have their cake and eat it too – with a state-owned bank."]




Center for Constitutional Rights: "Is this who we are?" asked President Obama almost one year ago during a speech in response to the mass hunger strike at Guantánamo prison and international condemnation over the force-feeding of men. Little has changed since that speech on May 23rd of last year. Not a single Yemeni has been released, even though the president lifted his self-imposed ban on transfers to Yemen, and men like our client Tariq Ba Odah, who continue hunger-striking, are still force-fed. On May 23rd, join activists across the world for a global day of action to close Guantánamo. We must keep the pressure on the administration to expedite the release of men already cleared for transfer and those it does not intend to charge. There will be demos in DC, NYC, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Hawaii, Munich, London, Sydney and many more cities (via Witness Against Torture)

Hedges, Chris. "We’re Losing the Last Shreds of Legal Rights to Protect Ourselves from Oligarchy." RINF (May 8, 2014)

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Resources for May 7, 2014

Kentuckians For the Commonwealth poll of candidate positions for the upcoming May 20, 2014 primaries: "2014 Kentucky Primary Election: Candidate Positions." -- of particular interest is the Lexington Mayoral race

Dershowitz, Alan, Glenn Greenwald, Michael Hayden and Alexis Ohanian. "Glenn Greenwald Debates Former NSA Director Michael Hayden." The Intercept (May 2, 2014) [Results of the debate]

Goldenberg, Suzanne. "Climate change is clear and present danger, says landmark US report: National Climate Assessment, to be launched at White House on Tuesday, says effects of climate change are now being felt." The Guardian (May 4, 2014)

Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Resources for May 7, 2014

The Unknown Known (USA: Errol Morris, 2013)


Doctorow, Cory. "Jacob Appelbaum's must-watch 30C3 talk: why NSA spying affects you, no matter who you are." Boing Boing (December 31, 2013)

Greene, Robyn. "Even Your Avatar Can't Escape NSA Surveillance." ACLU (December 12, 2013)

"Citizens Take Over Albuquerque City Council, Call For the Arrest of Chief: 'We now serve a people’s warrant for arrest on Albuquerque Police Chief Gordon Eden.'" Free Thought Project (May 6, 2014)

Eberhard, J.T. "After book is banned to satisfy religious parents, student hands out copies for free." Patheos (May 5, 2014)

Pitzer, Andrea. "Trotsky's Canadian Holiday." Lapham's Quarterly (May 6, 2014)

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Resources for May 6, 2014

Blyth, Mark, David Kaiser and Vanessa Williamson. "The French Sensation: Income Inequality in 700 Pages and a Hundred Graphs." Radio Open Source (May 1, 2014)

Frauenfelder, Mark. "Photos of the new Satanic monument being built for Oklahoma's Statehouse." Boing Boing (May 1, 2014)

Peters, Jeremy W. "Republican-Led Filibuster Blocks Minimum Wage Bill in Senate." The New York Times (May 1, 2014)

McDonough, Katie. "Tennessee just became the first state that will jail women for their pregnancy outcomes: Against the advice of doctors, addiction experts and reproductive health groups, Gov. Bill Haslam signed SB 1391." Salon (April 30, 2014)

The Editorial Board. "The Koch Attack on Solar Energy." The New York Times (April 27, 2014)

Fain, Paul. "Will Work in Beer." Inside Higher Ed (January 30, 2014) [Asheville, NC community college starts new 2 degree in Craft Beer brewing]

Jaschik, Scott. "Church and Tenure." Inside Higher Ed (May 5, 2014) ["The Kentucky Supreme Court has issued two unanimous decisions that strengthen the rights of tenured professors at religious institutions."]

Dialogic Cinephilia archive: Resources for May 5, 2014





Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day

gist \JIST\

noun 1 : the ground of a legal action; 2 : the main point or part : essence

I didn't catch every word, but I heard enough to get the gist of the conversation.

"If you have seen the animated children's movie Balto, you know the gist of the Iditarod story; however, there is more to the story than a mysterious wolf/dog who beat the odds, carried the antitoxin across the tundra and got the girl." — From an article by Victoria Burris in The Omnibus (Southwest Baptist University), March 5, 2014

"The gist of the conversation was that ...." The word "gist" often appears in such contexts to let us know that what follows will be a statement or summary that in some way encapsulates the main point or overarching theme. The gist of a conversation, argument, story, or what-have-you is what we rely on when the actual words and details are only imperfectly recalled, inessential, or too voluminous to recount in their entirety. "Gist" was borrowed from the Anglo-French legal phrase "[cest] action gist" ("[this] action lies") in the early 18th century, and was originally used in legal contexts as a term referring to the foundation or grounds for a legal action without which that action would not be legally sustainable.

Monday, May 05, 2014

Resources for ENG 102: Summer 2014

Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day



Laura Webb HIS 120 essay (paragraph thesis statements) [in work computer "documents" and gmail]

Business Insider: 6 Corporations Control 90% of the Media in America

Biotechnology/Eugenics lecture

Dialogic archive: Edward Snowden

Piece for Mayer for Mayor on Minimum Wage issue

Ken Robinson RSAnimate video -- Changing Education Paradigms

Dershowitz, Alan, Glenn Greenwald, Michael Hayden and Alexis Ohanian. "Glenn Greenwald Debates Former NSA Director Michael Hayden." The Intercept (May 2, 2014) [Results of the debate]

Political Compass Test

Resources for Re-thinking the World

Taylor, Bron. "Battleground Pandora: The War over James Cameron's Avatar." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)





Ferguson, Kirby. "Everything is a Remix." [Four short videos examining remix aesthetics in multiple art forms.]

Zurko, Nicholas. "Gender Inequality in Film." New York Film Academy (November 25, 2013)

Lexington Primaries

Holland, Joshua. "A Primer: Just What Is Net Neutrality — and Why All the Fuss?" Moyers & Co (May 2, 2014)

McNair, James. "Despite Cuts, Kentucky Community College Head Gets Lucrative Deal." Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting (May 8, 2014)

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Resources for May 1, 2014

Laurent Laveder photograph:


Dialogic Cinephilia archive: Resources for May 1, 2014


Happy May Day! International Workers' Holiday - Solidarity!



Pyke, Alan. "Seattle Announces $15 Minimum Wage, Highest In The U.S." Think Progress (May 1, 2014)


Merchant, Brian. "A Drone's Eye View of the Latest Oil Train Explosion." Motherboard (May 1, 2014)



Ross, Julianne. "The White House Just Released an Anti-Sexual Assault Video That Every Man Needs to See." PolicyMic (April 29, 2014)

Verso: Madison Van Oort -- Interns, Occupiers, and Strikers: A May Day 2014 Reading List

Greenberg, Joel. "A Feathered River Across the Sky." Radio West (April 24, 2014) ["This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the death of Martha, the last passenger pigeon. Her species was native to North America, and in the 1800s the birds numbered in the billions. Their vast airborne flocks reportedly blotted out the sun and took days to pass overhead. But in just a few decades, they were gone. Naturalist Joel Greenberg has written a book about the passenger pigeon’s natural history and its speedy flight to extinction, and he joins us to examine what the bird’s demise reveals about our relationship to the natural world."]

Wikipedia: Sock Puppet (Internat)

Dunning, Brian. "Animal Predictors: Psychic, Sensitive, or Silly?" Skeptoid (April 29, 2014)

Monday, April 28, 2014

Resources for April 28, 2014

Gusterson, Hugh and Elaine Scarry. "Are We Numb to Nukes?" Radio Open Source (April 10, 2014) ["We’re thinking our way through a plausible nuclear emergency with Elaine Scarry who reminds you – we’ve got a weapons monarchy in this democracy. Two decades after the fall of the Berlin wall and a nuclear football still accompanies the president at all times, nuclear missile silos still dot the great plains, and hundreds of nukes remain constantly on alert. How can we call it a democracy, the rule of the people, when there’s one man’s finger on the trigger that could destroy us all?"]

Business Insider: "6 Corporations Control 90% of the Media in America"


Mayer for Mayor comments on the Business Lexington article "HUD to Provide Lexington a Loan Guarantee for 21c Hotel Project.": "As a writing teacher, I bristle when places like art hotel 21C receive $6 million in federal loans earmarked for low income economic development. Leaders seem to have no shame in assuming that the Main Street project of billionaire bourbon heiress Laura Lee Brown represents 'a powerful public investment tool to drive economic development in underserved areas.' Main Street is underserved? Have we re-defined this word? This isn't a semantic question--it enabled 21C to receive over 60% of this city's lending capacity for creating low-income jobs. Keep that in mind when you hear city leaders bemoan the need to create good-paying jobs. When it comes to jobs for low-income residents, our brain trust went with house maid--and it accomplished this by giving billionaire Louisvillians a special $6 million loan at reduced rates."


"There are two parts to the human dilemma. One is the belief that the end justifies the means. That push-button philosophy, that deliberate deafness to suffering has become the monster in the war machine. The other is the betrayal of the human spirit. The assertion of dogma closes the mind and turns a nation, a civilization into a regiment of ghosts — obedient ghosts, or tortured ghosts." -- Jacob Bronowski, Ascent of Man (1973)


“This is the only story of mine whose moral I know. I don’t think it’s a marvelous moral; I simply happen to know what it is: We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” -- Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night (1961)







Dorr, Gary, et al. "Cowboy Indian Alliance Protests Keystone XL Pipeline in D.C. After Latest Obama Admin Delay." Democracy Now (April 28, 2014)

Johnsen, Gregory D. "60 Words And A War Without End: The Untold Story Of The Most Dangerous Sentence In U.S. History." Buzzfeed (January 16, 2014)

Ross, Julianne. "17 Lies We Need to Stop Teaching Girls About Sex." PolicyMic (April 25, 2014)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Resources for April 24, 2014

XKCD:



ACLU: The Department of Justice announced expanded criteria for clemency applicants during a press conference today. According to the DOJ, thousands more will now be able to ask the President to commute or pardon their sentence.

Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

April 23, 2014

April 24, 2014

Zander, Ben. "'Rite of Spring' Revival." Radio Open Source (April 22, 2014)

Jameison, Dave. "Fast Food CEOs Make 1,000 Times More Than Their Typical Workers: Report." Huffington Post (April 22, 2014)

Giroux, Henry A. "Neoliberalism, Democracy and the University as a Public Sphere." Truthout (April 22, 2014)

Dialogic Peace & Conflict Studies archive: Scott Horton (Lawyer -- Human Rights, Emerging Markets and International Law)

Sharma, Akhil. "On Family Life." Radio Open Source (April 23, 2014)["We’re in conversation with the writer that so many other writers are talking about, the Indian-born New Yorker, Akhil Sharma. His novel is Family Life, a faithful recounting in fiction of a horrific swimming-pool accident that did catastrophic brain damage to his gifted older brother and smashed his family’s immigrant adventure. But our conversation, like the book itself, is also about how writers are made, how agony becomes art, how memory wants be nudged forward. Akhil Sharma is telling us he chiseled 7,000 pages in draft to barely 200 pages in hardcover. It was a project, he says, that was full of love more than sadness, that was designed to be useful to his parents and others, and to move like a rocket. The conversation jumped from writing to life and back again, from Hemingway to Chekhov and Proust and the devices of storytelling and fiction. And we found that we were high on each other almost before we began."]


Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day:

fissiparous \fih-SIP-uh-rus\

adjective 1 : tending to break up into parts; 2 : creating disunity or dissension : divisive

EXAMPLES

The election for class president had a fissiparous effect on the school as students took sides for their favorite candidate.

"In Calvinism: A History, D.G. Hart … shows how Protestantism's fissiparous nature has allowed it to adapt and, in some instances, transmogrify to fit local and personal needs." — From a book review by Michael P. Orsi in the Washington Times (Washington D.C.), December 12, 2013

When it first entered English in the 19th century, "fissiparous" was concerned with reproduction. In biology, a fissiparous organism is one that produces new individuals by fission; that is, by dividing into separate parts, each of which becomes a unique organism. (Most strains of bacteria do this.) Both "fissiparous" and "fission" trace back to Latin "findere" ("to split"). The second part of "fissiparous" is rooted in Latin "parere" ("to give birth to" or "to produce"). Other "parere" offspring refer to other forms of reproduction, including "oviparous" ("producing eggs that hatch outside the body") and "viviparous" ("producing living young instead of eggs"). By the end of the 19th century "fissiparous" had acquired a figurative meaning, describing something that breaks into parts or causes something else to break into parts.

Scott Horton (Lawyer -- Human Rights, Emerging Markets and International Law)

Biographies/Archives/Organizations:

Wikipedia: Scott Horton

No Comment (Scott Horton's Blog on Harper's)

Columbia Law School: Scott Horton

The Nation Institute: Scott Horton

The International Center for Not-for-Profit Law: Scott Horton


Resources by/about/featuring Scott Horton:

Horton, Scott. "7 Letter Word." On the Media (April 24, 2009) ["While some in the media wondered if Obama flip-flopped when it comes to prosecuting Bush Administration officials who authorized torture, the White House tried to get its media message straight ... all without actually using the T-word. Columbia University law professor and Harper's Magazine contributing editor Scott Horton explains why the Administration, and some members of the media, are backing away from "torture.""]

---. "FCC Launches Probe of Alabama TV Station Accused of Censoring a 60 Minutes Expose on the GOP’s Prosecution of Alabama’s Imprisoned Former Gov. Don Siegelman." Democracy Now (March 6, 2008)

---. "Gonzales Resignation Puts Torture, Guantanamo Back on Center Stage in Washington." Democracy Now (August 28, 2007)

---. "Politicizing the Judiciary." Harper's (June 28, 2012)

---. "Secret Federal FISA Court Advocate of National Security State." Law and Disorder Radio (July 15, 2013)

---. "A Setback For Obama’s War On Whistleblowers." Law and Disorder Radio (August 15, 2011)

---. "The Torture Doctors." No Comment (November 4, 2013) ["An expert panel concludes that the Pentagon and the CIA ordered physicians to violate the Hippocratic Oath"]

---. "The Woman Who Could Nail Bush: Are the Worst of the Torture Memos Still to Come?" Alternet (March 29, 2009)

Rizzo, John and Scott Horton. "A Debate on Torture: Legal Architect of CIA Secret Prisons, Rendition vs. Human Rights Attorney." Democracy Now (March 28, 2014)

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Resources for April 23, 2014

Benton, Michael Dean. "Increase the Minimum Wage." Mayer for Mayor (April 21, 2014)

"60 Words." Radiolab (April 18, 2014) ["This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) - has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror." In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the past 12 years. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace."]

"Straight Outta Chevy Chase." Radiolab (April 1, 2014) ["Over the past 40 years, hip-hop music has gone from underground phenomenon to global commodity. But as The New Yorker's Andrew Marantz explains, massive commercial success is a tightrope walk for any genre of popular music, and especially one built on authenticity and “realness.” Hip-hop constantly runs the risk of becoming a watered-down imitation of its former self - just, you know, pop music. Andrew introduces us to Peter Rosenberg, a guy who takes this doomsday scenario very seriously. Peter is a DJ at Hot 97, New York City’s iconic hip-hop station, and a vocal booster of what he calls “real” hip-hop. But as a Jewish fellow from suburban Maryland, he's also the first to admit that he's an unlikely arbiter for what is and what isn't hip-hop. With the help of Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest and NPR's Frannie Kelley, we explore the strange ways that hip-hop deals with that age-old question: are you in or are you out?"]

Blackford, Linda. "University of Kentucky students protest plan to privatize dining services." Lexington Herald-Leader (April 21, 2014)

"Kill 'em All." Radiolab (March 25, 2014) ["Ever since there have been humans, mosquitoes have been biting us, and we’ve been trying to kill them. And, for the most part, the mosquitoes have been winning. Today there are over 3000 species on pretty much every corner of Earth. Mosquito-borne diseases kill around 1 million people a year (most of them children) and make more than 500 million people sick. But thanks to Hadyn Perry and his team of scientists, that might be about to change. Producer Andy Mills talks with author Sonia Shah about the difficulties of sharing a planet with mosquitoes and with science writer David Quammen about the risks of getting rid of them."]


Democracy Now Headlines for April 22, 2014:


Kitchell, Mark. "Earth Day Special: Fierce Green Fire Documentary Explores Environmental Movement’s Global Rise." Democracy Now (April 22, 2014)


Merriam-Webster Word-of-the-Day

oneiric \oh-NYE-rik\

adjective: of or relating to dreams : dreamy

EXAMPLES

The paintings, filled with fantastical imagery conjured by the artist's imagination, have a compellingly oneiric quality.

"Most of the actors here are double and triple cast, and if they barely differentiate among their roles, that just adds to the oneiric effect." — From a theater review by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe, March 12, 2012

The notion of using the Greek noun "oneiros" (meaning "dream") to form the English adjective "oneiric" wasn't dreamed up until the mid-19th century. But back in the early 1600s, linguistic dreamers came up with a few "oneiros" spin-offs, giving English "oneirocriticism," "oneirocritical," and "oneirocritic" (each referring to dream interpreters or interpretation). The surge in "oneiros" derivatives at that time may have been fueled by the interest then among English-speaking scholars in Oneirocritica, a book about dream interpretation by 2nd-century Greek soothsayer Artemidorus Daldianus.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Resources for April 19, 2014

Hudson, David. "Gabriel García Márquez, 1927 – 2014." Keyframe (April 17, 2014)

Wallace, Gregory. "Oklahoma bans local minimum wage hikes." CNN Money (April 15, 2014)

Gross, Daniel. "Radical Fast Food Joint Doubles Down on High Wages." The Daily Beast (September 9, 2013)

"Walmart on Tax Day: How Taxpayers Subsidize America’s Biggest Employer and Richest Family." Americans for Tax Fairness (April 2014)

Zornberg, Avivah. "The Transformation of Pharaoh, Moses, and God." On Being (April 10, 2014) ["With a master of midrash as our guide, we walk through the Exodus story at the heart of Passover. It's not the simple narrative you've watched at the movies or learned in Sunday school. Neither Moses or Pharaoh, nor the oppressed Israelites or even God, are as they seem. As Avivah Zornberg reveals, Exodus is a cargo of hidden stories — telling the messy, strange, redemptive truth of us as we are, and life as it is."]

"How U.S. Taxpayers Subsidize the Nation's Wealthiest Family." Jobs with Justice (April 14, 2014)

Jones, Ann. "How US Wars Came Home With the Troops: Up Close, Personal and Bloody." Truthout (April 17, 2014)

Courtney, Oliver. " One Percent of Environmentalists Killings Lead to Convictions: Global Witness report co-author Oliver Courtney discusses the alarming number of murders in South America and how governments and corporations work in unison to subvert indigenous rights." Real Network News (April 17, 2014)

Crabapple, Molly. "George Bush's Paintings Aren't Funny: But they are fascinating." Politico (April 13, 2014)

Pangburn, D.J. "These Short Online Psychedelic Courses Will Bend Your Mind." Motherboard (April 16, 2014)

Glaser, April. "Electronic Frontier Foundation is Expanding into Student and Community Organizing, and We Need Your Help." Electronic Frontier Foundation (April 9, 2014)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Resources for April 17, 2014

Popova, Maria. "Famous Advice on Writing: The Collected Wisdom of Great Writers." Brain Pickings (May 3, 2013)

Jayaraman, Saru. "All Work and No Pay." Bill Moyers and Co. (April 4, 2014) ["Did you know the federal minimum wage for millions of restaurant workers is $2.13 an hour? Advocate Saru Jayaraman says that’s not only unfair but unsafe."]

Dialogic archive: Laura Poitras: Documentary Filmmaker and Producer

Ravitch, Diane. "Public Schools for Sale." Moyers & Co. (March 28, 2014)

Taibbi, Matt. "Who Goes to Jail? Matt Taibbi on American Injustice Gap from Wall Street to Main Street." Democracy Now (April 15, 2014)


Center for Constitutional Rights: News on the torture accountability front -- Spain’s National Court is continuing its investigation into the alleged torture of men formerly detained at Guantánamo prison by U.S. officials, despite recent legislative restrictions stating that Spanish courts can only investigate human rights violations committed abroad if the suspects are present in Spain. In an order issued yesterday, Judge Pablo Ruz ruled that Spain’s obligations under international law to investigate any credible allegation of torture took precedence over the new restrictions, and renewed his request for information from the Obama Administration regarding any U.S.-based investigations into torture allegations.


Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for April 17, 2014

""This Award is for Snowden": Greenwald, Poitras Accept Polk Honor for Exposing NSA Surveillance." Democracy Now (April 14, 2014)

Kumar, Deepa. "Media Stokes Our Terrorism Mindset." The New York Times (April 16, 2014)

Isay, David. "The Everyday Art of Listening." On Being (April 17, 2014)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Laura Poitras (Documentary Filmmaker and Producer)

Biographies/Archives/Projects:

Wikipedia: Laura Poitras

Praxis Films: Laura Poitras

The Intercept ("The Intercept, a publication of First Look Media, was created by Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, and Jeremy Scahill. It has a two-fold mission: one short-term, the other long-term. Our short-term mission is to provide a platform to report on the documents previously provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Although we are still building our infrastructure and larger vision, we are launching now because we believe we have a vital obligation to this ongoing and evolving story, to these documents, and to the public. Our NSA coverage will be comprehensive, innovative and multi-faceted. We have a team of experienced editors and journalists devoted to the story. We will use all forms of digital media for our reporting. In addition, we will publish primary source documents on which our reporting is based. We will also invite outside experts with area knowledge to contribute to our reporting, and provide a platform for commentary and reader engagement. Our long-term mission is to produce fearless, adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues. The editorial independence of our journalists will be guaranteed. They will be encouraged to pursue their passions, cultivate a unique voice, and publish stories without regard to whom they might anger or alienate. We believe the prime value of journalism is its power to impose transparency, and thus accountability, on the most powerful governmental and corporate bodies, and our journalists will be provided the full resources and support required to do this. While our initial focus will be the critical work surrounding the NSA story, we are excited by the opportunity to grow with our readers into the broader and more comprehensive news outlet that the The Intercept will become.")

IMDB: Laura Poitras

Salon: Laura Poitras

Zeitgeist Films: Laura Poitras

The Guardian: Laura Poitras


Resources by/about Laura Poitras:

Appelbaum, Jacob and Laura Poitras. "Surveillance Teach-In." Praxis Films (April 20, 2012)

Appelbaum, Jacob, William Binney, and Laura Poitras. "More Secrets on Growing State Surveillance: Exclusive with NSA Whistleblower, Targeted Hacker." Democracy Now (April 23, 2012)

Greenwald, Glenn. "Finally: hear Bradley Manning in his own voice." The Guardian (March 12, 2013)

---. " U.S. filmmaker repeatedly detained at border: Laura Poitras makes award-winning controversial films, and is targeted by the U.S. government as a result." Salon (April 8, 2012)

Greenwald, Glenn and Laura Poitras. "Q&A on Snowden, the Surveillance State & Press Freedom." Democracy Now (April 11, 2014)

Greenwald, Glenn, Ewen MacAskill and Laura Poitras. "Edward Snowden: The Whistleblower Behind the NSA Surveillance Revelations." The Guardian (June 9, 2013)

---. "NSA shares raw intelligence including Americans' data with Israel." The Guardian (September 11, 2013)

Leonard, Andrew. "A Pulitzer triumph: Snowden reporting wins journalism’s top prize ." Salon (April 14, 2014)

Maas, Peter. "How Laura Poitras Helped Snowden Spill His Secrets." The New York Times (August 18, 2013)

Mizer, Brian and Laura Poitras. "The Oath." POV (September 21, 2010)

Poitras, Laura. "An American woman's startling tale of life in Iraq." NOW #241 (October 13, 2006)

---. "Detained in the U.S.: Filmmaker Laura Poitras Held, Questioned Some 40 Times at U.S. Airports." Democracy Now (April 20, 2012)

---. "The Program." The New York Times (August 23, 2012)

---. "Puzzling Over A Jihadi's Journey." Fresh Air (June 2, 2010)





Resources for April 15, 2014

Baker, Dean. "The Hedge Fund Managers Tax Break: Because Wall Streeters Want Your Money." Truthout (April 14, 2014)

Harvey, David. "17 Contradictions of Capitalism." London School of Economics and Political Science (April 2, 2014)

Boyd, Andrew and Jonathan Matthew Smucker. "Recapture the Flag." Beautiful Trouble (2014)

As a teacher, I'm not interested in just reproducing class after class of graduates who will get out, become successful, and take their obedient places in the slots that society has prepared for them. What we must do--whether we teach or write or make films--is educate a new generation to do this very modest thing: change the world. (15)
-- Zinn, Howard. "Stories Hollywood Never Tells." The Sun #343 (July 2004): 12-15.


[Michael Benton: This poem goes good with the latest episode of Cosmos I watched last night -- both expand my mind while bringing me down to a perspective that often escapes my notice.]

Spring Cress by Wesley Houp

No pollinator,
no mason,
orchard,
or honeybee,
no wasp,
no fly,
needs more
than two sips
to get to the shallow heart
of a Spring Cress blossom.

They go insatiably
from one flower to the next,
rapt in magnetism
that spurns
vagaries of wind,
sun,
shadow,
each bloom,
pointed with light,
providing scant sweetness,
but each white cross
an infinitesimal portion
to be multiplied by a billion
to comprise the whole
of the world.

Two statements of fact:
A single bee
will kill itself trying
to take in the whole,
one bee
after another
all spring,
but this world
has given up
on death for now.





Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for April 15, 2014)

Schlosser, Eric. "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety." Book TV (October 6, 2013) ["Using recently declassified documents, Eric Schlosser details the ease with which an accident can occur when handling nuclear weapons and how little control military leaders and missile designers have over them. He speaks with Lynn Davis, the former U.S. undersecretary for arms control and the director of the RAND corporation's Washington office."]

Fadiman, Dorothy. "Motherhood by Choice Not Chance." Making Contact (March 11, 2014) ["Before it was legal in the United States, some doctors would risk arrest to provide women with access to safe abortions. When that wasn’t possible, some sought abortions from unsafe providers, often with deadly consequences. The Supreme Court legalized abortion in 1973, and the numbers of people dying after having an abortion dropped, but are we now seeing a return to the past? ... what can the time before abortion was legal tell us about the dangers of restricting access to abortion today? We’ll hear a special radio adaption of “Motherhood by Choice not Chance” a documentary produced and narrated by Dorothy Fadiman.

"It was my job to report what those in power were doing or thinking . . . That is all someone in my sort of job can do." -- BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson (2014); Glenn Greenwald responded on Twitter: "That'd make an excellent epitaph on the tombstone of modern establishment journalism." (2014)

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Resources for April 8, 2014

"The War on/in Higher Education." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)





Derrick Jensen. "Endgame." Unwelcome Guests #311 (June 18, 2006) ["Derrick Jensen speaking about his forthcoming book, Endgame, on the hidden nature of violence in Western Culture, and the revolutionary nature of the changes needed to live on the land sustainability once more. He begins by explaining his premises, and argues from them why he believes violent destruction of man's civilizing influence on nature is the appropriate response, and one for which future generations will thank us."]


Center for Constitutional Rights: The Washington State Court of Appeals has affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit filed by five members of the Olympia Food Co-op against current and former members of the Co-op’s Board of Directors for their decision to boycott Israeli goods. The court held that the lawsuit was a Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation, or SLAPP, and that participation in the boycott is protected by the First Amendment. Read CCR's press release here.


Lowery, Wesley. "Mitch McConnell isn’t going to be a big fan of this week’s New Yorker cover." Washington Post (April 7, 2014)





Merriam-Webster Word-of-the-Day

virescent \vuh-RESS-unt\

adjective: beginning to be green : greenish
Examples:

Buds formed on the bare trees, infusing the stark branches with a slight virescent tint.

"While Heisman Trophy winner and National Football League quarterback Tim Tebow read 'Green Eggs and Ham,' during Dr. Seuss Week, Lincoln Elementary kindergarten teacher Mary Jo Bures quietly slipped away to a meeting. None of the kindergartners noticed, their eyes fixated on the screen, their ears absorbing the story of Sam I Am and his never wavering quest to get the narrator to try the virescent foods." — From an article by Chris Dunker in the Beatrice Daily Sun (Nebraska), February 25, 2014


Center for Constitutional Rights:
Today, CCR Senior Staff Attorney Pardiss Kebriaei is at Guantanamo, urging a Periodic Review Board to clear for release CCR client Ghaleb Al-Bihani. He has been imprisoned for 12 years without charge or trial. Watch Pardiss discussing Ghaleb's case in this vlog.


Kiely, Declan and Isaac Gewirtz. "Poe's Terror of the Soul." Lapham's Quarterly Podcast #51 (November 20, 2013)

Monday, April 07, 2014

Resources for April 6, 2014

"Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability." IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) (2014)

Ludwig, Mike. "FCC Votes To Curb Media Consolidation in Local TV Markets." Truthout (April 1, 2014)

Miller, Greg, Adam Goldman and Ellen Nakashima. "CIA misled on interrogation program, Senate report says." Washington Post (March 31, 2014)

Correia, David. "APD Riot Troops, Mounted Units, Tanks and Military-Style Tactical Units in Albuquerque." La Jicarita (March 31, 2014)

"Should GM Get the Death Penalty for 57 Cent Premeditated Murder? Truthout (April 3, 2014)

Potter, Will. "Animal Rights Activist Sentenced to 30 Months in Jail for Having Bolt Cutters in His Car." Vice (April 3, 2014)




." Mullins, Paul. "The Peep Show of Death: Televising Human Remains." Archaeology and Material Culture (March 28, 2014)

Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for April 5, 2014


Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day

debunk \dee-BUNK\

verb: to expose the sham or falseness of

At the premiere of their new movie, the actor and actress addressed the media to debunk the rumor that they were dating.

If you guessed that "debunk" has something to do with "bunk," meaning "nonsense," you're correct. We started using "bunk" at the beginning of the 20th century. (It derived, via "bunkum," from a remark made by a congressman from Buncombe county, North Carolina.) A little less than 25 years later, "debunk" was first used in print for the act of taking the "bunk" out of something. There are plenty of synonyms for "debunk," including "disprove," "rebut," "refute," and the somewhat rarer "confute." Even "falsify" can mean "prove something false," in addition to "make something false." "Debunk" itself often suggests that something is not merely untrue, but also a sham; one can simply disprove a myth, but if it is "debunked," the implication is that it was a grossly exaggerated or foolish claim.


Thursday, April 03, 2014

Resources for April 3, 2014

Maguire, Robert. "Despite Disclosure, Dark Money Stays Dark in Nevada." Open Secrets (March 31, 2014)


Center for Constitutional Rights: While Donald Rumsfeld gets to explain himself in yet another film, instead of a court of law, here are the stories of U.S. veterans and Iraqi civilians fighting to overcome the harm caused by his actions. We've known for a decade that Rumsfeld lied and bears criminal responsibility for a massive host of international and domestic crimes. It is time to focus on the stories of those who will bring him, Bush, Cheney, and the rest, to justice. Here’s the full VIDEO of the People’s Hearing on the Lasting Impact of the Iraq War.


Democracy Now Headlines for April 3, 2014



Sanders, Bernie. "Supreme Court Undermines Democracy by Allowing Billionaires to "Buy Elections." Democracy Now (April 3, 2014)

Kroll, Andy. "'The Next Citizens United': McCutcheon Opens Floodgates for 1 Percent to Spend Millions on Campaigns." Democracy Now (April 3, 2014)

Claybrook, Joan and Ken Rimer. "Ex-Auto Safety Head & Parent of Dead Victim: GM CEOs Should Face Prison for Covering Up Safety Flaws." Democracy Now (April 3, 2014)


Center for Constitutional Rights: As the Senate Intelligence Committee moves to vote today on whether to declassify its report on the CIA’s post-9/11 torture practices, here's a reminder that torture is happening even today, on President Obama’s watch, at Guantánamo Bay.


Hintze, Thomas. "Homeland Security Study Praises Occupy Sandy, With Murky Intentions." Truthout (April 2, 2014)

Koerth-Baker, Maggie. "Archaeologists vs. The National Geographic Channel." Boing Boing (April 1, 2014)

Henwood, Doug. "A Return to a World Marx Would Have Known." The New York Times (March 30, 2014)

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Resources for April 1, 2014

Morin, Roc. "Assault Rifles for Christ." Vice (March 28, 2014)

Barlow, Maude, Richard Grossman and Thomas Linzey. "When Lawmaking Becomes Rebellion (Water Privatization, Democracy School and the Corporate State)." Unwelcome Guests #307 (May 21, 2006) ["A new populist alliance of long time environmental activists and rural folk in central Pennsylvania has grown out of a struggle to ban toxic agribusiness operations that have targeted the area as the next profit opportunity. This movement is taking a new approach that is spreading across America via a project of public education and organization called democracy schools, that are teaching direct action lawmaking to challenge corporate supremacy and to create rights under law for people and the land."]

Wall, Richard. "Who's Afraid of Noam Chomsky?" Lew Rockwell (2004)

Dialogic archive: Noam Chomsky (Linguist/Political Economy/Historian/Philosopher/Cognitive Scientist)


Lapham, Lewis. "Crowd Control." Lapham's Quarterly (Spring 2014) [This is the introduction to the new special themed issue on "Revolution."]


Center for Constitutional Rights: “A report by the Senate Intelligence Committee concludes that the CIA misled the government and the public about aspects of its brutal interrogation program for years — concealing details about the severity of its methods, overstating the significance of plots and prisoners, and taking credit for critical pieces of intelligence that detainees had in fact surrendered before they were subjected to harsh techniques… The report also does not recommend new administrative punishment or further criminal inquiry into a program that the Justice Department has investigated repeatedly.” President Obama must declassify the full Senate report and we must remain uncompromising in our demand for criminal prosecutions of U.S. officials who authorized and carried out torture. Transparency without accountability is meaningless.


Democracy Now Headlines for March 31, 2014:



El-Fattah, Alaa Abd. "Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah on Prison & Regime’s 'War on a Whole Generation.'" (March 31, 2014)

"We apologize for the inconvenience, but this is a revolution." -- Subcomandante Marcos to a group of tourists on New Year's Day 1994 during the Zapatista capture of San Cristobal (cited in Florence Babb's book The Tourism Encounter: Fashioning Latin American Nations and Histories)

Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for April 1, 2014

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Resources for March 30, 2014

Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for March 28, 2014


Zinn Education Project: Women's History Month and Labor History -- Florence Reece was an activist, poet, and songwriter. She was the wife of one of the strikers and union organizers, Sam Reece, in the Harlan County miners strike in Kentucky. In an attempt to intimidate her family, the sheriff and company guards shot at their house while she and her children were inside (Sam had been warned they were coming and escaped). During the attack, she wrote the lyrics to Which Side Are You On?, a song that would become a popular ballad of the labor movement. Read more about this song in the children's book "Which Side Are You On? The Story of a Song". Learn about more women in labor history here.


Global Uprisings: Footage from the student demonstration in Madrid on March 27th




"10 Things They Won't Tell You About Money in Politics." Open Secrets (2014)











Potter, Gary. "Fundamental Violence: Protestant Fundamentalism and Violent Crime." Uprooting Criminology (November 11, 2013)

Carlin, Dan. "Vlad and Dianne." Common Sense #272 (March 22, 2014) ["Russia annexes the Crimea and the intelligence community's biggest supporter, Sen. Feinstein turns against the CIA. How can Dan choose between these two stories? He doesn't. He deals with both of them in this episode."]

Cheves, John. "Kentucky Lawmakers strike deal on state budget, but Rupp Arena out of luck." Lexington Herald-Leader (March 30, 2014)

Bodhi, Bhikkhu. "Of Budgets, Values and Visions." Truthout (March 30, 2014)

Friday, March 28, 2014

Resources for March 28, 2014

Hélène, C. "Police arrest Alexandria workers as strikes continue nationwide." Libcom (March 26, 2014)

Kouddous, Sharif Abdel. "3 Years After Revolution, Egypt Faces Deadly Polarization & Growing Militancy." Democracy Now (January 30, 2014)

Kouddous, Sharif Abdel. "Egypt’s Courts Further Repression with Journos on Trial & Mass Death Sentence for Morsi Supporters." Democracy Now (March 26, 2014)

Chris Hedges and Hamza Yusuf. "Does God Love War? (A Dialog on Religion and the State)." Unwelcome Guests #306 (May 14, 2006)

Dialogic archive: Chris Hedges: Journalist/War Correspondent

Morris, Earl. "The Unknown Known: Errol Morris’ New Doc Tackles Unrepentant Iraq War Architect Donald Rumsfeld." Democracy Now (March 27, 2014)


Egyptian Winter by Brandon Jourdan
"Two years after the revolution in Egypt began, unrest continues across the country as the political and economic situation worsens. As the current government consolidates its power, the demands of the revolution may seem further away than ever. Still the revolution has opened up new spaces for political action, spurring public debate on issues that have gone unacknowledged and unresolved for too long.

This short documentary looks at some of the reasons motivating revolutionaries to keep taking the streets, the obstacles that they are facing, and the tactics that they are using. It looks into the current economic and political problems facing Egyptians, the growing independent union movement, black bloc tactics, and the response of women to sexual assaults."



Global Uprisings ("Global Uprisings is an independent news site and video series dedicated to showing responses to the economic crisis from around the world. Brandon Jourdan and Marianne Maeckelbergh have been travelling, researching, and making short films about responses to the economic crisis and current uprisings. Their short films and articles detail social movements in Spain, Greece, the UK, the US, and Egypt. These films and articles cover the riots, demonstrations and occupations in the UK, large-scale housing occupations and demonstrations in Spain, massive and continuous general strikes, and self-reduction campaigns in Greece, the ongoing revolution in Egypt, and occupy movements within the United States. Throughout the project, they have also collaborated with collectives and media makers such as the Mosireen collective, Grit TV, Deep Dish TV, Big Noise Films, Democracy Now, and David Martinez.")

Jourdan, Brandon. "New Documentary: Bosnia and Herzegovina in Spring." Global Uprisings (March 21, 2014) ["This short documentary tells the story of the uprising in Bosnia and Herzegovina that started in early February 2014. Since February 5 2014, protests have swept across Bosnia and Herzegovina. The protests were started by workers from five factories in northern city of Tuzla: Dita, Polihem, Poliolhem, GUMARA and Konjuh. The factories had been privatized, bankrupted and stripped of assets, leaving the workers with large debts, no salaries, no health care and no benefits. The protests culminated on February 7, 2014 when several governmental buildings were set on fire in cities across the country, including the presidential building in Sarajevo. Under pressure of protests, four regional governments resigned. The protests were followed with mass popular assemblies, referred to as plenums, that quickly spread across the country."]

Desvarieux, Jessica. "Hundreds of Students and Faculty Occupy College Campus To Fight Cuts to Public Higher Ed." Truth-Out (March 25, 2014)

For Truthout Richard D. Wolff's Economic Updates: "Updates on labor struggles at the University of Southern Maine; how low interest rates hurt retirees; the super-rich getting state subsidies; Northwestern University athletes moving to unionization; the BBC on US unemployment; and Nestle's CEO vs. human right to water. Major discussions on income distribution vs. redistribution; Maryland cutting taxes on rich and leaving tipped workers' minimum wages at $3.63/hour; and a final segment on criticisms of capitalism. Response to listener's questions on Bill Gates' C-Span interview."


Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day:

adscititious \ad-suh-TISH-us\

adjective 1 : derived or acquired from something on the outside; 2 : supplemental, additional

EXAMPLES

"We should choose our books as we would our companions, for their sterling and intrinsic merit, not for their adscititious or accidental advantages." — From Charles Caleb Colton's 1832 book Lacon

"I thrilled to crates of chilly hardware—coffee tins of rusty nails and mismatched bolts and nuts, odd attachments, gimcrack, rickrack, and adscititious crap…." — From William Davies King's 2008 book Collections of Nothing

"Adscititious" comes from a very "knowledgeable" family—it ultimately derives from "scire," the Latin verb meaning "to know." "Scire" also gave us "science," "conscience," "prescience" ("foreknowledge"), and "nescience" ("lack of knowledge"). "Adscititious" itself comes to us from "scire" by way of the Latin verb "adsciscere," which means "to admit" or "to adopt." This explains why "adscititious" describes something adopted from an outside source.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Resources for March 27, 2014

We Are Many:
Moderators: Tithi Bhattacharya and Anthony Arnove
Speakers: Alex Lichtenstein, Jesse Hagopian, James Loewen, Susan Curtis, Anne Wright, Staughton Lynd, Tiffany Montoya and Fernando Tormos
In honor of historian Howard Zinn and all the ordinary people he celebrated in his work, on Tuesday November 5, scholars and activists from across the country took part in a Read-in of Zinn's work on the campus of Purdue University and on campuses across the nation. The day marks the birthday of another fighter for social justice -- Indiana-born labor activist, Eugene Debs. The idea for the event was sparked when the Associated Press reported that the current Purdue University President Mitch Daniels, in 2010 as Governor of Indiana, tried to censor and ban Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States" from Indiana schools. When the news became a national scandal, many students, faculty, and citizens of Indiana had expressed deep concern over the news that the President of one of our great public universities would have attempted such censorship. 'The Zinn Read-in Committee' envisions the event to be a commemoration of academic freedom and a declaration of anti-censorship. The event also symbolized the ongoing fightback in the United States against the privatization of public education, attacks on teachers and teachers unions, and the need for real democracy in both schools and curriculum. Zinn's A People's History of the United States is an important text for understanding the history of underrepresented populations; the fight for the right to teach this history is never separate from the fight to improve the material lives of students, teachers, minorities and workers around the world. The Zinn Read-in Committee encourages support for this event by any means possible.]


Dialogic archive: Howard Zinn (Historian/Playwright/Political Science)

Ali, Mostafa and Hani Shukrallah. "What Happened to the Egyptian Revolution?" We Are Many (June 2013)

Crawshaw, Steve. "10 Everyday Acts of Resistance That Changed the World." Yes! (April 1, 2011)

Hermes, Kris and Omar el-Shafei. "White-washing Human Rights Abuses and Suppressing a Popular Revolution; Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi Ousted Following Days of Massive Largest Anti-Government Protest." Law and Disorder (July 8, 2013)


Our schoolbooks would like us to believe that social change must always be gradual and peaceful. Sudden, abrupt changes are seen as disruptions of a “normal” functioning society. “Respectable” society looks upon mass protest, civil disobedience, strikes, disruption and revolution with horror. But fundamental social change rarely comes gradually. Industrial unions didn’t come to this country by the gradual addition, year after year, of a few new unions. On the contrary, mass industrial unionism came in an explosion of organizing and mass strikes over a period of about five years, from 1934 to 1938. The gains of the civil rights movement were achieved through heroic civil disobedience and mass protest in the face of systematic racist terror.

While governments caution the governed to act peacefully and to refrain from drastic action, they themselves reserve the right to use overwhelming force. There was nothing gradual about the invasion of Iraq.

Revolution is the ultimate social leap – a period when the gradual accumulation of mass bitterness and anger of the exploited and oppressed coalesces and bursts forth into a mass movement to overturn existing social relations and replace them with new ones. A few days of revolutionary upheaval bring more change than decades of “normal” development. Rulers and systems that seemed invincible and immovable are suddenly unceremoniously toppled. Revolution is not an aberration in an otherwise smoothly functioning society.

The last three centuries have been filled not only with wars, but also with revolutions and near-revolutions. A list of only some of these gives us an idea of the scope of revolutionary upheaval since the dawn of modern capitalism: the American Revolution (1776-87), the French Revolution (1789-94), the US Civil War (1861-65), the European revolutions of 1848, the Russian Revolutions (1905 and 1917), the German Revolution (1918-23), China (1925-27), the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), the Hungarian Revolution (1956), Chile (1973), Portugal (1974-75), Iran (1979), Poland’s Solidarnosc uprising (1980-81). This partial list is enough to put to rest the notion that revolutions are rare or unusual occurrences.

Paul D’Amato, The Meaning of Marxism (Haymarket Books, 2006)


Newman, Zak. "What's the Difference Between Force Feeding and Waterboarding?" Blog of Rights (March 24, 2014)

Kinzer, Stephen and William Murphy, Jr. "US Wars and Social Control (From Regime Change Abroad to the War on Drugs at Home)." Unwelcome Guests #304 (April 30, 2006) ["In our first hour, this week, Stephen Kinzer, whose book, Overthrow, details the US empire's long history of instigating regime change, both the public pretext and the real interests at play. In our second hour, William Murphy Jr speaks about the "War On Drugs"."]



Glenn Greenwald Speaks Out
Socialism 2013
Introduced by Jeremy Scahill and Sherry Wolf
Glenn Greenwald speaks via Skype to the Socialism 2013 conference in Chicago regarding Edward Snowden's revelations about the NSA's mass surveillance program. Introductions by Jeremy Scahill, author of Blackwater and the filmmaker behind Dirty Wars, and Sherry Wolf, author of Sexuality and Socialism. #Socialism2013 #Snowden #NSA


Dialogic archive: Glenn Greenwald: Constitutional and Civil Rights Lawyer/Journalist


Democracy Now headline:
Egyptian General Resigns to Clear Run for Presidency

The head of the Egyptian military has stepped down, paving the way for his candidacy in the upcoming presidential elections. General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi led the coup that ousted Egypt’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, last July, and has overseen the ensuing crackdown that’s left hundreds dead and thousands behind bars. Sisi has a strong base of support and is expected to win. On Wednesday, one person was killed near Egypt’s Cairo University in ongoing protests against the sentencing of over 500 Muslim Brotherhood members to death. The protests come as over 900 additional Brotherhood members were ordered to stand trial on charges of terrorism and murder.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Resources for March 25, 2014

Dialogic Cinephilia: Resources for March 24, 2014

Powless, Irving, Jr. and Robert Venables. "Who Are These People?(The Onondaga Nation Encounters European Settlers)." Unwelcome Guests #302 (April 16, 2006)

Iraqi human rights activists and Iraq Veterans Against the War are determined to show the true costs of the Iraq War and hold the U.S. government accountable for the suffering and destruction it caused. Join them by tuning in to the People's Hearing on the Impact of the Iraq War this Wednesday at 6:30pm EST via CCR's live-stream.








Dialogic archives:

Resources for Re-Thinking the World

Social Movements/Resistance: Peace and Conflict Studies


Project Censored: Top 25 Censored Stories from 2012-2013





Dale, Tom. "Will Egypt's Mass Death Sentence Provoke More Violence?" Vice (March 25, 2014)