Friday, February 28, 2014

Resources for February 28, 2014




Takei, George. "George Takei on Arizona’s Anti-Gay Bill, Life in a Japanese Internment Camp & Star Trek’s Mr. Sulu." Democracy Now (February 27, 2014)

Naureckas, Jim. "News From Venezuela–but Where Is It Coming From?" FAIR (February 22, 2014)

Greenwald, Glenn. "How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations." The Intercept (February 24, 2014)

Hasemeyer, David and Lisa Song. "Big Oil and Bad Air: Report Exposes Link Between Fracking and Toxic Air Emissions in Texas." Democracy Now (February 27, 2014)

Ackerman, Spencer and James Ball. "GCHQ intercepted webcam images of millions of Yahoo users worldwide." The Guardian (February 27, 2014)


Shoe by Wesley Houp

As a child, my old man
found a shoe with a foot in it
that had belonged to Sam Waldrop
some years before, but now
it was sort of finders-keepers,
and it would amaze any kid
how many odd-shaped bones
make a foot, like turtle bones,
so he’d be reluctant to share
such a discovery, let alone
give it back, without making
all the proper inspections.

What is a foot but a secret
of twenty-some-odd strange turns,
a message of spur and mishap
in a patent leather bottle.

When the train struck Sam,
he came apart at the seams.
He’d been sleeping, drunk,
on High Bridge, and his shoe,
it turned out, came to rest
atop the southernmost pier,
isolated from the rest of the world
by the river’s deep current
and people’s reluctance
to go looking for a drunk’s foot.

But the shoe was loyal beyond
the call of shoes, beyond
his stride, beyond even the body
as a cohesive unit, like a sarcophagus
full of callused history.
What, then, of a man’s comings
and goings, worn by pressures
from every conceivable direction,
carried in a vessel mail-ordered from Sears?


Cromwell, David. "Bias Towards Power *Is* Corporate Media ‘Objectivity’: Journalism, Floods And Climate Silence." Media Lens (February 13, 2014)

Blackford, Linda B. "Proposed state budget would divert $76 million away from cash-strapped student aid programs." Lexington Herald-Leader (February 25, 2014)

Lovan, Dylan. "Funding after evolution debate spurs ark project." Lexington Herald-Leader (February 27, 2014)

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Resources for February 27, 2014

Democracy Now Headlines for February 25, 2014



Crespo, Glenn and Larry Hildes. "Inside the Army Spy Ring & Attempted Entrapment of Peace Activists, Iraq Vets, Anarchists." Democracy Now (February 25, 2014)

Seth, Leila. "India: You’re Criminal If Gay." The New York Review of Books (March 20, 2014)

Mitchell, Jerry and Dawn Porter. "Spies of Mississippi: New Film on the State-Sponsored Campaign to Defeat the Civil Rights Movement." and "PART 2: Interview with "Spies of Mississippi" Director and Reporter Jerry Mitchell." Democracy Now (February 25, 2014)

Elliot, Natalie. "Tutwiler Women’s Prison Is a Hothouse of Sexual Violence." Vice (February 25, 2014)

Poenaru, Florin. "To Make Sense of Ukraine, We Need to Bring the Class Back In." LeftEast (February 24, 2014)

"Arizona governor vetoes religious freedom bill." PBS (February 26, 2014)

The Lives of Others (Germany: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006) [Ongoing Dialogic Cinephilia archive]


Democracy Now Headlines for February 26, 2014


Chandler, Bill, et al. "Chokwe Lumumba: Remembering "America’s Most Revolutionary Mayor" Democracy Now (February 26, 2014)

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Michael Ratner: Lawyer/Civil Liberties/Human Rights/President of Center for Constitutional Rights

Biographies/Archives/Organizations/Podcasts:

Wikipedia: Michael Ratner

Center for Constitutional Rights

The Guardian: Michael Ratner

@justleft

The Real News: The Ratner Report

Law and Disorder Radio

IMDB: Michael Ratner Filmography

Democracy Now: Michael Ratner


Resources by/featuring/about Michael Ratner:

Assange, Julian and Michael Ratner. "Julian Assange on Being Placed on NSA 'Manhunting' List & Secret Targeting of WikiLeaks Supporters." Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Goodman, Melvyn and Michael Ratner. "Ex-CIA Officials Tied to Rendition Program and Faulty Iraq Intel Tapped to Head Obama’s Intelligence Transition Team." Democracy Now (November 17, 2008)

Griffin, Ben and Michael Ratner. "Ecuador Grants Julian Assange Asylum; U.S. Seen as "Hidden Hand" Behind U.K. Threat to Raid Embassy." Democracy Now (August 16, 2012)

Radack, Jesselyn and Michael Ratner. "Spying on Lawyers: Snowden Documents Show NSA Ally Targeted U.S. Law Firm." Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Ratner, Michael. "Edward Snowden isn't the only truth teller who deserves clemency: Chelsea Manning, Julian Assange and Jeremy Hammond deserve the same public outrage and support as Snowden." The Guardian (January 15, 2014)

---. "Exposed: U.S. May Have Designated Julian Assange and WikiLeaks an 'Enemy of the State'." Democracy Now (September 27, 2012)

---. "Obama’s national security state: Michael Ratner interviewed by Anthony Arnove." International Socialist Review #74 (November 2010)

---. "On Detainee Abuse Reports." Counterspin (December 19, 2008)

---. "Speech on Bradley Manning in Washington DC." Law and Disorder Radio (The event was held at All Souls Church Unitarian in Washington DC, December 2012)

---. "Ten Years after 9/11: War, Operation American Condor (Guantanamo), Civil Liberties and Hope." Law and Disorder Radio (July 25, 2011)

---. "WikiLeaks Attorney on Manning Guilty Verdict: Blowing Whistle on U.S. War Crimes is Not Espionage." Democracy Now (July 30, 2013)

Resources for February 25, 2014

Carlin, Dan. "Blueprint for Armageddon II." Hardcore History #51 (January 30, 2014) [The Great Powers all come out swinging in the first round of the worst war the planet has ever seen. Millions of men in dozens of armies vie in the most deadly and complex opening moves of any conflict in world history.]


Wesley Houp's description of the Tennessee Duck River region:

No sooner than it reaches Manchester, the first of a handful of towns nestled along its banks, the Barren Fork veers to the southwest, dropping dramatically over the Fort Payne Formation (the hard layer of chert undergirding the softer, less consolidated limestone) at Blue Hole and Big Falls. Here, the Little Duck River falls precipitously in from the east, and the two streams form a natural moat around the mysterious, 2,000 year-old Native American ceremonial structure known as Old Stone Fort. As Edward Luther notes in Our Restless Earth: The Geologic Regions of Tennessee, the ancient structure, consisting of heavy stonewalls covered with earth and circumscribing a 50-acre plateau, immediately suggests a defensive fortification, thus its modern name, Old Stone Fort. But more recent hypotheses suggest the structure served more benign purposes as a sort of celestial observatory. The structure’s once-colossal entryway arch, evidenced today by only two overgrown pedestal mounds, aligns with the sun during the summer solstice. Whatever its function might have been, archeologists are fairly certain of its builders. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal excavated from the site points to the McFarland culture, natives who occupied the upper Duck during the Middle Woodland Period between 200 B.C. and 200 A.D. Construction probably began some time in the first century A.D., but after 400 years of continuous habitation along the Duck River, the McFarland peoples mysteriously gave way to the Owl Hollow Culture, who concluded construction of Old Stone Fort around 550 A.D. For reasons that are unclear, by 600 A.D. they, too, abandoned the area.



"It was my job to report what those in power were doing or thinking . . . That is all someone in my sort of job can do." -- BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson (2014)


"My own concern is primarily the terror and violence carried out by my own state, for two reasons. For one thing, because it happens to be the larger component of international violence. But also for a much more important reason than that; namely, I can do something about it. So even if the U.S. was responsible for 2 percent of the violence in the world instead of the majority of it, it would be that 2 percent I would be primarily responsible for. And that is a simple ethical judgment. That is, the ethical value of one’s actions depends on their anticipated and predictable consequences. It is very easy to denounce the atrocities of someone else. That has about as much ethical value as denouncing atrocities that took place in the 18th century." -- Noam Chomsky(2012)



Merriam-Webster Word-of-the-Day

solatium \soh-LAY-shee-um\

noun: a compensation (as money) given as solace for suffering, loss, or injured feelings

The judge ordered the company to pay a solatium to each of the unjustly fired workers.

"The amount of cash a politician was required by tradition to dispense regularly in the form of wedding gifts and funeral solatiums for people in his ever-expanding constituency was now, by itself, enough to bankrupt most wealthy men." — From Robert Whiting's 1999 book Tokyo Underworld : The Fast Times and Hard Life of an American Gangster in Japan

In legal circles, a solatium is a payment made to a victim as compensation for injured feelings or emotional pain and suffering (such as the trauma following the wrongful death of a relative), as distinct from payment for physical injury or for damaged property. Like many legal terms, "solatium," which first appeared in English in the early 19th century, is a product of Latin, where the word means "solace." The Latin noun is related to the verb "solari," which means "to console" and from which we get our words "solace" and "console."


Kocher, Greg. "Experts encourage Jessamine community to protect its rare plants, animals." Lexington Herald-Leader (February 23, 2014)

Latin Radical podcast: "CISPES observers at Salvadoran Elections 2014"

Recommended: current issue #92 of Cineaction on Politics & Cinema

"Noam Chomsky (Linguist/Political Economy/Historian/Philosopher/Cognitive Scientist)" [Ongoing Dialogic archive]

"Michael Ratner: Lawyer/Civil Liberties/Human Rights/President of Center for Constitutional Rights" [Ongoing Dialogic archive]

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Resources for February 23, 2014

The Host (South Korea: Bong Joon-Ho, 2006) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)


Merriam-Websters' Word-of-the-Day

teem \TEEM\

verb 1 : to become filled to overflowing; 2 : to be present in large quantity

EXAMPLES

By mid-morning the theme park will already be teeming with visitors.

"Dispensing with the last installment's cumbersome mythology, this one gets back to basics, dumping the hero on a desert planet teeming with lethal critters and determined bounty hunters." — From a movie review by Tom Russo in The Boston Globe, January 12, 2014

The verb "teem" and the noun "team" are not just homophones, they are also etymological kin. "Teem" is derived from Old English "tīman" or "tæman," which originally meant "to bring forth offspring" or "to become pregnant" and which is related to the ancestor of "team," the Old English noun "tēam," meaning "offspring, lineage, or group of draft animals." "Team" can still be used to refer to a brood of young animals, especially pigs or ducks, but both "teem" and "team" have otherwise largely left their offspring-related senses behind.


Rothrock, Kevin. "Pro-Maidan Video Goes Viral Thanks to Pavel Durov, Russia's Zuckerberg." Global Voices (February 22, 2014)

Bohdanova, Tetyana. "#EuroMaidan Medic Shot in Neck Lives to Tweet: 'I Am Alive!'” Global Voices (February 22, 2014)

In The Nation an audio commentary by Charles Grodin: "How to Offend Corporations by Just Doing Your Job" ["What happens when the media is either owned by big corporations or reliant on those corporations for advertising dollars? Unobstructed, honest commentary tends to be the first casualty."]

Chutkan, Robynne. "The Future of Probiotics." The Atlantic (December 12, 2013) ["Hippocrates said that all disease begins in the gut. A gastroenterologist's predictions on how new treatments will begin there, too."]

Ford, Matt. "A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design." The Atlantic (February 21, 2014)

Walker, Shaun. "Ukraine's former PM rallies protesters after Yanukovych flees Kiev: Yulia Tymoshenko addresses crowd in Kiev after release from prison, as MPs vote to impeach Viktor Yanukovych." The Guardian (February 22, 2014)

Proyect, Louis. "The gangster billionaire behind Ukraine’s president." The Unrepentent Marxist (February 19, 2014)

Friday, February 21, 2014

Resources for February 21, 2014

Horton, Scott. "The Torture Doctors." Harpers (November 4, 2013) [An expert panel concludes that the Pentagon and the CIA ordered physicians to violate the Hippocratic Oath.]

Kilkenny, Allison. "The Poster Boy For Unending War." The Smirking Chimp (February 20, 2014)

Sovyn, Olena. "#Euromaidan Protests Spread Throughout Ukraine After Explosion of Violence." Global Voices (February 20, 2014)

"Protests in Venezuela." Global Voices (Ongoing archive: 2014)

Carlin, Dan. "Blueprint for Armageddon I." Hardcore History #50 (October 29, 2013)

Hudson, David. "Zero Dark Thirty and the CIA." Keyframe (May 8, 2013)

"Zero Dark Thirty (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2012)." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Benton, Michael Dean. "Introduction and Discussion of The Battle of Algiers." Dialogic Cinephilia (February 20, 2014)

The Battle of Algiers (Italy/Algeria: Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Democracy Now Headlines for February 20, 2014


Chen, Stephen. "A New Cold War? Ukraine Violence Escalates, Leaked Tape Suggests U.S. Was Plotting Coup." Democracy Now (February 20, 2014)


Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day
small beer \SMAWL-BEER\

noun 1 : weak or inferior beer; 2 : something of small importance : trivial

The money we spend on cable is small beer compared to the mortgage payment we have to come up with every month.

"The main drink was 'small beer', which had a low alcohol content—just enough to preserve it—and was drunk by almost everyone, from children to old men, instead of water." — From an article by Alex Fensome in The Dominion Post (New Zealand), January 13, 2014


"Small beer" dates from Shakespeare's day. The Bard didn't coin it (he would have been just a child in 1568, the date of the first documented instance of "small beer"), but he did put the term to good use. In Henry VI, Part 2, for example, the rebel Jack Cade declares that, when he becomes king, he will "make it felony to drink small beer." In Othello, Desdemona asks Iago to describe a "deserving woman." Iago responds by listing praises for ten lines, only to conclude that such a woman would be suited "to suckle fools, and chronicle small beer"; in other words, to raise babies and keep track of insignificant household expenses. Desdemona quickly retorts, declaring Iago's assertion a "most lame and impotent conclusion."

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Resources for February 20, 2014

Lee, Kevin. "Finding Freedom the Second Time Around: The Politics of Before Sunset." Senses of Cinema (October 2004)

Carlin, Dan. "Neutral Nets & Reform Bets." Common Sense #268 (January 20, 2014) ["President Obama floats some reform ideas for the gathering of data by the NSA and a judge strikes a blow against Net Neutrality. Dan has a few long-winded thoughts on both these subjects."]




serendipity \sair-un-DIP-uh-tee\

noun : the faculty or phenomenon of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; also : an instance of this

EXAMPLES

We found the restaurant by pure serendipity, rather than careful research, but it turned out to be the best deal in town.

"Many young people today have never had the experience of getting lost.… They have not experienced the pleasure of wandering while lost and discovering by serendipity interesting new places." — From an op-ed by Katie Davis and Howard Gardner in the Seattle Times, January 7, 2014

In the mid-1700s, English author Horace Walpole stumbled upon an interesting tidbit of information while researching a coat of arms. In a letter to his friend Horace Mann he wrote: "This discovery indeed is almost of that kind which I call Serendipity, a very expressive word, which as I have nothing better to tell you, I shall endeavor to explain to you: you will understand it better by the derivation than by the definition. I once read a silly fairy tale, called 'The Three Princes of Serendip': as their highnesses travelled, they were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of…." Walpole's memory of the tale (which, as it turns out, was not quite accurate) gave "serendipity" the meaning it retains to this day.


Democracy Now headlines for February 19, 2014:



Cox, Laverne and CeCe McDonald. "'Black Trans Bodies Are Under Attack': Freed Activist CeCe McDonald, Actress Laverne Cox Speak Out." Democracy Now (February 19, 2014)

Sustainable World Coalition. Sustainable World Sourcebook. Berkeley, CA: New Society Publishers, 2010.

Feldman, Karen. "Walter Benjamin and his 'Artwork' essay." Entitled Opinions (July 3, 2013) [They are discussing Benjamin's 1936 essay: "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction"

Anti-Oedipus was lobbed into the fray like an intellectual cluster bomb -- it had multiple targets, from the primacy of the signifier in linguistics to the dependency on lack in psychoanalysis, but its primary objective was (as Michel Foucault astutely points out in his highly influential preface to the English translation) to caution us against the fascist inside, the desire to seize power for oneself. The principle thesis of Anti-Oedipus, around which its many conceptual inventions turn, is that revolution is not primarily or even necessarily a matter of taking power. Insofar as taking power means preserving all the old institutions and ideas in which power is invested it could even be said that revolutions of this type are actually counter-revolutionary in purpose and intent because they change nothing essential. By the same token, Deleuze and Guattari were concerned about the allure of power, its apparent ability to drive us to desire to be placed under its yoke. The most important political question, as far as Deleuze and Guattari are concerned, is how it is possible for desire to act against its interest. (Buchanan, Ian. Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus. NY: Continuum, 2008: 21.)

Benton, Michael Dean. "Notes on Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophernia." Dialogic (February 20, 2014)

Michael Dean Benton: Notes on Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

(Notes on the book and references to other commentators)

Anti-Oedipus was lobbed into the fray like an intellectual cluster bomb -- it had multiple targets, from the primacy of the signifier in linguistics to the dependency on lack in psychoanalysis, but its primary objective was (as Michel Foucault astutely points out in his highly influential preface to the English translation) to caution us against the fascist inside, the desire to seize power for oneself. The principle thesis of Anti-Oedipus, around which its many conceptual inventions turn, is that revolution is not primarily or even necessarily a matter of taking power. Insofar as taking power means preserving all the old institutions and ideas in which power is invested it could even be said that revolutions of this type are actually counter-revolutionary in purpose and intent because they change nothing essential. By the same token, Deleuze and Guattari were concerned about the allure of power, its apparent ability to drive us to desire to be placed under its yoke. The most important political question, as far as Deleuze and Guattari are concerned, is how it is possible for desire to act against its interest. (Buchanan, Ian. Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus. NY: Continuum, 2008: 21.)


Wikipedia summary of Anti-Oedipus

Background:

An introduction to the importance of May 1968 events in Paris and the rest of the world throughout that explosive year(as well as the aftermath) is essential to an understanding of this book and the development of late-20th Century French theory.

Guattari’s background as a radical psychiatrist is also very important.

Deleuze on their working relationship:

We are only two, but what was important for us was less our working together than this strange fact of working between the two of us. We stopped being “author.” And these “between the twos” referred back to other people, who were different on one side from on the other. ... In these conditions, as soon as there is this type of multiplicity, there is politics, micro-politics. (Deleuze and Parnet, 17)


Form/Style of the Book:

In D & G’s writings before and after Anti-Oedipus they develop an understanding of how theoretical perspectives can actually construct/create subjectivity. This is the critique of psychoanalysis in A-O.

Creating a theoretical model of subjectivity implies an ethical and aesthetic choice on the part of the theorist, in fact Guattari emphasizes this when he subtitles his later book Chaosmosis, “An Ethico-Aesthetic Paradigm”. Keeping this in mind how is the form/style of this book an attempt to create or construct a model of subjectivity? Is it successful in its attempt? Is Michel Foucault correct in calling this a ‘book of ethics’?

Mark Seem in his introduction following Henry Miller states that “No pain, no trouble—this is the neurotic’s dream of a tranquilized and conflict-free existence” and in reference to A-O that “What it attempts to cure us of is the cure itself” (xvi-xvii). Is the construction of this book centered around the authors’ resistance of the easy cure or strict (dogmatic) program? How are they attacking the “neurotic’s dream” ... keeping in mind that the psychoanalyst is the super-neurotic?

Claire Colbrook states that:

Rather than using reason and reasoned arguments, the book sought to explain and historicise the emergence of an essentially repressive image of reason. Rather than argument and proposition it worked by questions and interrogation: why should we accept conventions, norms, and values? What stops us from creating new values, new desires, or new images of what it is to be and think? This book was not a move within an already established debate; it shifted the entire criteria of the debate. Against justification and legitimation, it put forward the power of creation and transformation. It did not adopt the single voice of universal reason but, like a novel, ‘played’ with the voices of those traditionally deemed to be at the margins of reason ... (5)




Anti-Psychoanalytic Institution?:

It is often thought that Oedipus is an easy subject to deal with, something perfectly obvious, a “given” that is there from the very beginning. But that is not so at all: Oedipus presupposes a fantastic repression of desiring-machines. (A-O, 3)


One of the main questions raised in this quote and the accompanying footnote is: How did Freud appropriate the author(ity) of Greek tragedy to legitimize his psychoanalytic concepts? How does this relate to the second chapter's critique of the institution of psychoanalysis as a new secular religion set up by the followers of Freud and institutionalized by the military-industrial complex?

It is as if Freud had drawn back from this world of wild production and explosive desire, wanting at all costs to restore a little order there, an order made classical owing to the ancient Greek theater. ... It is only little by little that he makes the familial romance, on the contrary, into a mere dependence on Oedipus, and that he neuroticizes everything in the unconscious at the same time as he oedipalizes, and closes the familial triangle over the entire unconscious. ... The unconscious ceases to be what it is—a factory, a workshop—to become a theater, a scene and its staging. And not even an avant-garde theater, such as existed in Freud’s day ..., but the classical theater, the classical order of representation. The psychoanalyst becomes a director for a private theater, rather than the engineer or mechanic who sets up units of production, and grapples with collective agents of production and antiproduction. (54-55)


Has psychoanalysis shut down the (expanding on D & G) continuously evolving production of an unconscious in order to provide an all-encompassing, static analytic backdrop? What about their referencing of mechanics/engineers who facilitate the flows of production and recognize the collective processes?

For we must not delude ourselves: Freud doesn’t like schizophrenics. He doesn’t like their resistance to being oedipalized, and tends to treat them more or less as animals. They mistake words for things, he says. They are apathetic, narcissisitic, cut off from reality, incapable of achieving transference; they resemble philosophers—‘an undesirable resemblance.’ (A-O, 23)


This position of D & G seems unfair until we read the notes on the bottom of pages 56 and 59. How does the analyst construct a position free from doubt/criticism (leaving aside that they are supposed to submit to even super-super neurotics for analysis) in order to construct the patient’s world? (is this an unfair view of the analyst?—what does the two notes supply us as evidence of the analyst’s position—or how about the writings of Lacan)

It is not a question of denying the vital importance of parents or the love attachment of children to their mothers and fathers. It is a question of knowing what the place and the function of parents are within desiring-production, rather than doing the opposite and forcing the entire interplay of desiring-machines to fit within the restricted code of Oedipus. (47)


Is it possible that, by taking the path that it has, psychoanalysis is reviving an age-old tendency to humble us, to demean us, and to make us feel guilty? ... [is it] completing the task begun by nineteenth-century psychology, namely, to develop a moralized, familial discourse of mental pathology ... keeping European humanity harnessed to the yoke of daddy-mommy and making no effort to do away with this problem once and for all.... Hence, instead of participating in an undertaking that will bring about genuine liberation, psychoanalysis is taking part in the work of bourgeois repression at its most far-reaching level. (50)




D & G set out to develop schizoanalysis as their answer to this problem.

Schizoanalysis:

First important distinction is to remember that they are proposing an active schizophrenia that differs from the incapacitating medical designation of schizophrenia. D & G’s schizoanalysis grows out of their resistance to institutionalized psychoanalysis that has infiltrated all parts of society with a totalizing theory that masks humanity’s true relationship to the world:

From the moment we are measured in terms of Oedipus—the cards are stacked against us, and the only real relationship, that of production, has been done away with. (A-O, 24)


We cannot say that psychoanalysis is very innovative in this respect: it continues to ask its questions and develop its interpretations from the depths of the Oedipal triangle as its basic perspective, even though today it is acutely aware that this frame of reference is not at all adequate to explain so-called psychotic phenomena. (14)


A schizophrenic out for a walk is a better model than a neurotic laying on the analyst’s couch. A breath of fresh air, a relationship with the outside world (A-O, 2)


We no longer believe in the dull gray outlines of a dreary, colorless dialectic of evolution, aimed at forming a harmonious whole out of heterogeneous bits by rounding off their rough edges. We believe only in totalities that are peripheral. And if we discover such a totality alongside various separate parts, it is a whole of these particular parts but does not totalize them; it is a unity of all of these particular parts but does not unify them; rather, it is added to them as a new part fabricated separately. (42)


To withdraw a part from the whole, to detach, to ‘have something left over,’ is to produce, and to carry out real operations of desire in the world ... The whole not only coexists with all the parts; it is contiguous to them, it exists as a product that is produced apart from them and yet at the same time is related to them. (41, 43-44)


An important part of schizoanalysis is the development of a “schizoanalytic cartography” (A-O, 273-382). Guattari in another work states:

From my own perspective, which is guided by a shift of human and social sciences from “scientistic” paradigms to ethico-aesthetic ones, the question is no longer one of knowing if the Freudian unconscious or the Lacanian unconscious offers scientific solutions to the problem of the psyche. The models will only be considered as one among others for the production of subjectivity, inseparable from the technical and institutional mechanisms that support them, and from their impact on psychiatry, on university teaching, the mass media. ... In a more general way, one will have to admit that each individual, each social group, conveys its own system of modelling unconscious subjectivity, that is, a certain cartography made up of reference points that are cognitive, but also mythic, ritualistic, and symptomatological, and on the basis of which it positions itself in relation to its affects, its anxieties, and attempts to manage its various inhibitions and drives. Moreover, today, our question is not only of a speculative order, but has practical implications: do the models of the unconscious that are offered us on the “market” of psychoanalysis meet current conditions for the production of subjectivity? Is it necessary to transform them, or to invent new ones? What processes are set in motion in the awareness of an inhabitual shock? How do modifications to a mode of thinking, to an aptitude for the apprehension of a changing external world, take effect? How do representations of the external world change as it changes? The Freudian unconscious is inseparable from a society that is attached to its past, to its phallocratic traditions, and its subjective variants. Contemporary upheavals undoubtably call for a modelization turned more toward the future and to the emergence of new social and aesthetic practices in all areas. On the one hand, the devaluation of the meaning of life provokes the fragmentation of self-image: representations of self become confused and contradictory while, on the other hand, the conservative forces of resistance oppose themselves to all change, which is experienced by a secure, ossified, and dogmatic consciousness as an attempt at destabilization. (Guattari, “Subjectivities”: 197)


Deleuze adds:

... the diagram is no longer an auditory or visual archive but a map, a cartography that is coextensive with the whole social field. (Deleuze, Foucault: 34)


After setting up the problem as they see it in A-O they will later attempt in A Thousand Plateaus to propose a mutable method for approaching this problem. Of course this will not be a solution that must be seized and made one’s own in order for it to have any effect:

The rhizome is altogether different, a map and not a tracing. Make a map, not a tracing. The orchid does not reproduce the tracing of the wasp; it forms a map with the wasp, in a rhizome. What distinguishes the map from the tracing is that it is entirely oriented toward an experimentation in contact with the real. The map does not reproduce an unconscious closed in upon itself; it constructs the unconscious. It fosters connections between the field, the removal of blockages on bodies without organs, the maximum opening of bodies without organs onto a plane of consistency. It is itself a part of the rhizome. The map is open and connectable in all of its dimensions; it is detachable, reversible, susceptible to constant modification. It can be torn, reversed, adapted to any kind of mounting, reworked by an individual, group, or social formation. It can be drawn on a wall, conceived of as a work of art, constructed as a political action or as a mediation. (A Thousand Plateaus, 12)




On Capitalism:

Capitalism is schizophrenic because it is interested in profit and it must subvert/deterritorialize all territorial groupings such as familial, religious, or other social bonds. At the same time it relies on the continuous appearance/mythification of social groupings in order to continue functioning smoothly and to re-enforce social ordering needs. Thus, capitalism attempts to re-constitute the need for traditional/nostalgic, or, even, newer forms of social groupings or religious/state institutions. This deterritorialization/reterritorialization and decoding/recoding is happening at the same time—thus the schizophrenic nature of capitalism.

Does this schizophrenia of...

1) mindless consumption, selfish individualism, may the best man win, the cream rises to the top, the romantic creative individual, sacrifice/gorge ...

2) religious revivalism, family values (valuing no one else's family), community values (at the expense of other communities), moral majority, neighborhood watch (and snitch), etc...

...cause some of us to break under the strain of an absurd society?

Desire

... desire is revolutionary in its essence ... and no society can tolerate a position of real desire without its structures of exploitation, servitude, and hierarchy being compromised. (A-O 116)


Socius:

Primitive territorial machine:
Everything is coded and ritualized. Territory is clearly marked out and understood. Everything is social.

Barbaric territorial machine (despot):
The social group is somewhat deterritorialized by the despot who continues to maintain order through a re-inscription of a highly coded production centered around the ruler (what he says goes). Part of the coding (ordering) process is carried out through ritualized dramas of bodily punishment that (re)territorialize (re/produce) the despot’s authority (for a good description of this read the first section of Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish. NY: Pantheon Books, 1977.)

Civilized capitalist machine (disciplinary society):
Radically deterritorializes and reterritorializes social life. This radical deterritorialization is played out in conjunction with a continuous reterritorialization (re-coding) of traditional/ancient/nostalgic forms of authority. The nation (state), the family (father), God (religion or ideology), education (schools), media (societal super-ego?), etc ... re-appear in modified forms to shore up a shaky social grid and continue the smooth process of production/consumption. (A-O, 33-35) This society creates order through disciplinary institutions that house both the young initiates in order to train them to operate according to custom and the failed individuals that opt to pursue non-legitimized occupations/identities (for the moment let me use this designation—I’m fully aware that there are those who present a serious danger to others and thus must be dealt with, but the disciplinary society represents and treats them as morally weak individuals rather than as products of this society). The development and celebration of the myth of the private individual comes into play in this territorial situation.

Although some excitable critics (both from the left and right—e.g Baudrillard/Fukuyama) see this stage as the ‘end of history’, Deleuze, expanding on Foucault, sees us moving into a new socius stage (plateau?):

It is true that we are entering a society that can be called a society of control. A thinker such as Michel Foucault has analyzed two types of societies that are rather close to us. He calls the former sovereign societies and the latter disciplinary societies. He locates the typical passage of a sovereign society to a disciplinary society with Napolean. Disciplinary society is defined—by the accumulation of structures of confinement: prisons, schools, workshops, hospitals. Disciplinary societies require this. This analysis engendered ambiguities in certain of Foucault’s readers because it was believed that this was his last thought. This was certainly not the case. Foucault never believed and indeed said very precisely that disciplinary societies were not eternal. Moreover, he clearly thought that we were entering a new type of society. To be sure, there are all kinds of things left over from disciplinary societies, and this for years on end, but we know already that we are in societies of another sort that should be called, to use the term put forth by William Burroughs—whom Foucault admired greatly—societies of control. We are entering into societies of control that are defined very differently from disciplinary societies. Those who look after our interests do not need or will no longer need structures of confinement. These structures—prisons, schools, hospitals—are already sites of permanent discussion. Wouldn’t it be better to spread out the treatment? Yes, this is unquestionably the future. The workshops, the factories—they are falling apart everywhere. Wouldn’t systems of subcontracting and work at home be better? Aren’t there means of punishing people other than prison? Even the school. The themes that are surfacing, which will develop in the next forty or fifty years and which indicates that the most shocking thing would be to undertake school and a profession at once—these themes must be watched closely. It will be interesting to know what the identity of the school and the profession will be in the course of permanent training, which is our future and which will no longer necessarily imply the regrouping of school children in a structure of confinement. A control is not discipline. In making highways , for example, you don’t enclose people but instead multiply the means of control. I am not saying that this is the highway’s exclusive purpose, but that people can drive infinitely and “freely” without being at all confined yet while still being perfectly controlled. This is our future. (Deleuze, “Having An Idea of Cinema”: 17-18)


For more on this also check out Deleuze’s essay in October #59 (1992): 3-8 and excerpts of D & G’s writings in Rethinking Architecture: A Reader in Cultural Theory. ed. Neil Leach (NY: Routledge, 1997: 309-18.)



Schizo-Politics:

D & G resist a molar politics that frames its operations in a “already” determined future, thus they keep to the idea of a molecular politics that is open to change:

Schizoanalysis, as such, has no political program to propose. If it did have one it would be grotesque and disquieting at the same time. It does not take itself for a party, and does not claim to speak for the masses. No political program will be elaborated within the framework of schizoanalysis. (380)


D & G see a central paradox in our fascisms:

As Reich remarks, the astonishing thing is not that some people steal or that others occasionally go out on strike, but rather that all those who are starving do not steal as a regular practice, and all those who are exploited are not continually out on strike: after centuries of exploitation, why do people still tolerate being humiliated and enslaved, to such a point, indeed, that they actually want humiliation and slavery not only for others but for themeselves? (A-O, 29)


This makes all authoritarian and dogmatic movements suspect in that they dictate and predict:

... no, the masses were not innocent dupes; at a certain point, under a certain set of conditions, they wanted fascism, and it is this perversion of the desire of the masses that needs to be accounted for.” (A-O, 29)


Traditionally many writers have posited that subjects of bloody states are ignorant of the true processes behind-the-scenes that produce orderly societies ... D & G are contradicting this belief ... why do they see fascism as answering a perverted desire of the masses? What causes this perverted desire? Can we see any signs of fascism in the contemporary American culture/societies? Can we recognize the fascist impulse in totalizing revolutionary theories? Is this another problematic of the “totalizing” impulse as manifested in liberatory/resistive movements? Is this a legitimate complaint from marginalized groups?

D & G are calling for a resistance that is molecular, not molar (machinic, not mechanistic). Universal mass movements are not the goal, but they are not denying their potential, rather that mass movements would be forged through alliances/bridges, that are temporary, mutable, and situational.

Machines:

Pgs. 36-41 introduces the “three breaks” or interruptions of machines. When thinking of the bodies in these operations we must learn to alter our emphasis on the individual ‘body’ and recognize social, economic, political, juridical, etc ... bodies in these descriptions.

Claire Colebrook on “machines” in A-O and Deleuze’s theory in general:

In Anti-Oedipus they insist that the machine is not a metaphor and that life is literally a machine. This is crucial to Deleuze’s ethics. An organism is a bounded whole with an identity and end. A mechanism is a closed machine with a specific function. A machine, however, is nothing more than its connections; it is not made by anything, is not for anything and has no closed identity. So they are using ‘machine’ here in a specific and unconventional sense. Think of a bicycle, which obviously has no ‘end’ or intention. It only works when it is connected with another ‘machine’ such as the human body; and the production of these two machines can only be achieved through connection. The human body becomes a cyclist in connecting with the machine; the cycle becomes a vehicle. But we could imagine different connections producing different machines. The cycle becomes an art object when placed in a gallery; the human body becomes an ‘artist’ when connected with a paintbrush. The images we have of closed machines, such as the self-contained organism of the human body, or the efficiently autonomous functioning of the clock mechanism, are effects and illusions of the machine. There is no aspect of life that is not machinic; all life only works and is insofar as it connects with some other machine.

We have already seen the importance Deleuze gives to the camera; it is important as a machine because it shows how human thought and life can become and transform through what is inhuman. By insisting that the machine is not a metaphor Deleuze and Guattari move away from a representational model of language. If the concept of machine were a metaphor, then we could say that we have life as it is, and then the figure of machine to imagine, represent of picture life. But for Deleuze and Guattari there is no present life outside its connections. We only have representations, images or thoughts because there have been ‘machinic’ connections: the eye connects with light, the brain connects with a concept, the mouth connects with a language. Life is not about one privileged point—the self-contained mind of ‘man’—representing some inert outside world. Life is a proliferation of machinic connnections, with the mind or brain being one (sophisticated) machine among others.

Neither philosophy, nor art, nor cinema represent the world, they are events through which the movement of life becomes. What makes philosophy and art active is their capacity to become not just mechanistically, being caused by outside events, but machinically. A mechanism is a self-enclosed movement that merely ticks over, never transforming or producing itself. A machinic becoming makes a connection with what is not itself in order to transform and maximize itself. (56-57)


Schizo-Environmentalism:

D & G denounce the human/nature division and insist that humans cannot be thought separate from nature. Or as they later paraphrase Karl Marx “he who denies God does only a ‘secondary thing,’ for he denies God in order to posit the existence of man, to put man in God’s place” (A-O, 58). Guattari later re-emphasizes the importance of this attempt to recognize the falsity of the division of human/nature:

Our survival on this planet is not only threatened by environmental damage but by a degeneration in the fabric of social solidarity and in the modes of psychical life, which must literally be re-invented. The refoundation of politics will have to pass through the aesthetic and analytical dimensions implied in the three ecologies—the environment, the socius and the psyche. We cannot conceive of solutions to the poisoning of the atmosphere and to global warming due to the greenhouse effect, or to the problem of population control, without a mutation of mentality, without promoting a new art of living in society. (Chaosmosis, 20)



Buchanan, Ian. Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus. NY: Continuum, 2008.

Colebrook, Claire. Gilles Deleuze. NY: Routledge, 2002.

Deleuze, Gilles. Foucault. trans. Sean Hand. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1988.

---. “Having An Idea In Cinema.” trans. Eleanor Kaufman. Deleuze and Guattari: New Mappings in Politics, Philosophy and Culture. eds. E. Kaufman and K. J. Heller. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1998: 14-22.

Delueze, Gilles and Felix Guattari. Anti-Oedipus. trans. Robert Hurley, et al. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1983.

---. A Thousand Plateaus. trans. Brian Massumi. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1987.

Deleuze, Gilles and Claire Parnet. Dialogues. NY: Columbia U P, 1987.

Fanon, Frantz. Black Skin, White Masks. NY: Grove P, 1967.

Guattari, Felix. Chaosmosis. Bloomington, IN: Indiana U P, 1995.

------------------------------------------

More online resources

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

HUM 221: Contemporary Peace & Conflict Studies (Spring 2015)

[Gathering resources -- suggestions welcome]


Hedges, Chris. War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning. NY: Random House, 2003.

Klein, Naomi. Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. NY: Metropolitan Books, 2007.

Solnit, Rebecca. A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster. NY: Viking, 2009.

Resources for February 18, 2014




Mador, Chase. "The Over-Policing of America: Police Overkill Has Entered the DNA of Social Policy." TomDispatch (December 8, 2013)

Copps, Michael. "Former FCC Commissioner Warns About Comcast-Time Warner Merger, "Mindless" Media Consolidation." Democracy Now (February 17, 2014)





Assange, Julian and Michael Ratner. "Julian Assange on Being Placed on NSA "Manhunting" List & Secret Targeting of WikiLeaks Supporters." Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Radack, Jesselyn. "Attorney for Edward Snowden Interrogated at U.K. Airport, Placed on 'Inhibited Persons List'" Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Radack, Jesselyn and Michael Ratner. "Spying on Lawyers: Snowden Documents Show NSA Ally Targeted U.S. Law Firm." Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Greenhouse, Steven. "Republican-Funded, Anti-Labor Campaign Succeeds in Tennessee As Volkswagen Workers Reject UAW Union." Democracy Now (February 18, 2014)

Mirrlees, Tanner. "How to Read Iron Man: The Economics, Geopolitics and Ideology of an Imperial Film Commodity." Cineaction #92 (2014)

Carlin, Dan. "The Challenges of Living Dangerously." Common Sense #269 (February 5, 2014) ["The death of actor Phillip Seymour Hoffman has Dan contemplating how society might better handle the vagaries of human nature if we would be honest about what human beings often want."]

Monday, February 17, 2014

Resources for February 17, 2014




Cocozza, Paula. "Oppressed Majority: the film about a world run by women that went viral." The Guardian (February 11, 2014)

Wade, Lisa. "U.S. Rare in the Spending of More Money on the Education of Rich Children." Sociological Images (December 8, 2013)

Marks, Ben. "Trailing Angela Davis, from FBI Flyers to 'Radical Chic' Art." Collector's Weekly (July 3, 2013)

Huffington Post: "Texas Sports Anchor Dal Hansen Delivers Jaw-Dropping Speech On Gay NFL Players"











IndieWire: "The 15 Best Documentaries Of 2013"


Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day

probity \PROH-buh-tee\

noun : adherence to the highest principles and ideals : uprightness

EXAMPLES

The tale of young George Washington's refusal to tell a lie after cutting down his father's cherry tree was told to us as grade schoolers to illustrate his probity.

"The Senate has confirmed Jeh Johnson, once the Pentagon's top lawyer, to lead the Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Johnson brings a sharp legal mind and reputation for probity to the job." — From an editorial in The New York Times, December 26, 2013

"Probity" and its synonyms "honesty," "honor," and "integrity" all mean uprightness of character or action, with some slight differences in emphasis. "Honesty" implies a refusal to lie or deceive in any way. "Honor" suggests an active or anxious regard for the standards of one's profession, calling, or position. "Integrity" implies trustworthiness and incorruptibility to a degree that one is incapable of being false to a trust, responsibility, or pledge. "Probity," which descends from Latin "probus," meaning "honest," implies tried and proven honesty or integrity.


Jessleyn Radack for Daily Kos: "Clapper's Spin Unravels in Congressional Testimony: Cannot Keep His Story Straight on Snowden"

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Resources for February 15, 2014

Merriam-Webster Word-of-the-Day
crepitateAudio \KREP-uh-tayt\

DEFINITION

verb: to make a crackling sound : to make a series of short, sharp noises

EXAMPLES

Most of the tiny town's residents had something to contribute to the bonfire, and it burned brightly and crepitated loudly late into the night.

"A familiar synthetic beat starts the disc…. The band slowly fills in around the pulse, wind blowing through tunnels, factories moaning, yawning infrastructure, broken, creaking. Embers of some final blast crepitating." — From a music review by David King in Metroland, October 17, 2013

"Crepitate" comes from the Latin word "crepitare," meaning "to crackle." It has been used with this meaning since the late 1820s, but it had a previous life: about 200 years prior it was used to mean "to break wind." That meaning is now obsolete, and the word has no embarrassing remnants. In addition to its general use as a synonym of "crackle," "crepitate" also has a specific medical meaning—"to produce or experience crepitation." "Crepitation" here refers to a grating or crackling sound or sensation, such as that produced by the fractured ends of a bone moving against each other.


Ham, Julie. "Can Immigration Officers Predict Trafficking by Looking at Women’s Underwear?" Border Criminologies (September 12, 2013)

Democracy Now: "Debate: Was Snowden Justified? Former NSA Counsel Stewart Baker vs. Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg."

Musgrave, Beth. "Council members want more details about financing for Rupp Arena renovation." Lexington Herald-Leader (February 14, 2014)

Three Oscar Nominated Documentaries:

Rowley, Rick and Jeremy Scahill. "Dirty Wars: Jeremy Scahill and Rick Rowley’s New Film Exposes Hidden Truths of Covert U.S. Warfare." Democracy Now (January 22, 2013)

Oppenheimer, Joshua. "The Act of Killing: New Film Shows U.S.-Backed Indonesian Death Squad Leaders Re-enacting Massacres." Democracy Now (July 19, 2013)

Noujaim, Jehane. "The Square: Jehane Noujaim’s New Film Captures Egypt’s Ongoing Revolution After Mubarak’s Fall." Democracy Now (January 25, 2014)

The Square (Egypt/USA: Jehane Noujaim, 2013) [Ongoing archive of resources on Dialogic Cinephilia)

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Jeremy Scahill (Journalist/Filmmaker/)

Biographies/Archives on/for Jeremy Scahill:

Wikipedia: Jeremy Scahill

The Nation: Jeremy Scahill

Twitter: Jeremy Scahill

Democracy Now: Jeremy Scahill


Resources by/about/featuring Jeremy Scahill:

Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield (Official website for the documentary)

Engelhardt, Tom. "The Long March of Jeremy Scahill's 'Dirty Wars'." The Nation (April 23, 2013)

Gosztola, Kevin. "Through Bradley Manning, Jeremy Scahill Learned Blackwater’s Erik Prince Was Going to United Arab Emirates." Firedoglake (April 24, 2013)

Greenwald, Glenn and Jeremy Scahill. "Death By Metadata: Jeremy Scahill & Glenn Greenwald Reveal NSA Role in Assassinations Overseas." Democracy Now (February 10, 2014)

---. "Defying Threats to Journalism, Jeremy Scahill & Glenn Greenwald Launch New Venture, The Intercept." Democracy Now (February 10, 2014)

---. "Report: Obama Administration Considers Assassinating Another American Overseas." Democracy Now (February 10, 2014)

The Intercept ("The Intercept, a publication of First Look Media, was created by Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, and Jeremy Scahill. It has a two-fold mission: one short-term, the other long-term. Our short-term mission is to provide a platform to report on the documents previously provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Although we are still building our infrastructure and larger vision, we are launching now because we believe we have a vital obligation to this ongoing and evolving story, to these documents, and to the public. Our NSA coverage will be comprehensive, innovative and multi-faceted. We have a team of experienced editors and journalists devoted to the story. We will use all forms of digital media for our reporting. In addition, we will publish primary source documents on which our reporting is based. We will also invite outside experts with area knowledge to contribute to our reporting, and provide a platform for commentary and reader engagement. Our long-term mission is to produce fearless, adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues. The editorial independence of our journalists will be guaranteed. They will be encouraged to pursue their passions, cultivate a unique voice, and publish stories without regard to whom they might anger or alienate. We believe the prime value of journalism is its power to impose transparency, and thus accountability, on the most powerful governmental and corporate bodies, and our journalists will be provided the full resources and support required to do this. While our initial focus will be the critical work surrounding the NSA story, we are excited by the opportunity to grow with our readers into the broader and more comprehensive news outlet that the The Intercept will become.") Muscati, Samar and Jeremy Scahill. "Blackwater Founder Erik Prince’s Private Army of “Christian Crusaders” in the UAE." Democracy Now (May 18, 2011)

Rowley, Richard and Jeremy Scahill. "Dirty Wars: Jeremy Scahill and Rick Rowley’s New Film Exposes Hidden Truths of Covert U.S. Warfare." Democracy Now (January 22, 2013)

---. "America's Dangerous Game: This film examines the covert war in Yemen and asks if the US is creating more enemies than it can capture or kill." People and Power (March 8, 2012)

Scahill, Jeremy. "As U.S. Escalates Pakistan Drone Strikes, Expansive "Kill List" Stirs Fears of Worse Civilian Toll." Democracy Now (June 5, 2012)

---. "Blackwater Founder Implicated in Murder." The Nation (April 4, 2009)

---. "'Blackwatergate'–Private Military Firm in Firestorm of Controversy over Involvements in Iraq, Afghanistan and Germany." Democracy Now (January 8, 2010)

---. "Blackwater’s Secret War in Pakistan: Jeremy Scahill Reveals Private Military Firm Operating in Pakistan under Covert Assassination and Kidnapping Program." Democracy Now (November 24, 2009)

---. "The Dangerous US Game in Yemen." The Nation (April 18, 2011)

---. "End of Iraq Combat Operations or Beginning of Downsized, Rebranded Occupation Relying Heavily on Private Military Contractors?" Democracy Now (August 3, 2010)

---. "An investigation reveals how the CIA is expanding its presence in Somalia." Free Speech Radio (July 14, 2011)

---. "Killing Americans: On Obama Admin’s Admission 4 U.S. Citizens Died in Drone Strikes." Democracy Now (May 23, 2013)

---. "Secret Erik Prince Tape Exposed." The Nation (May 3, 2010)

---. "The World Is a Battlefield: "Dirty Wars" and Obama’s Expanding Drone Attacks." Democracy Now (April 24, 2013)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Resources for February 11, 2014




Benton, Michael Dean. "Exploring the Nature and Causes of Violence in Film." Uprooting Criminology (February 10, 2014)

Morley, David and Bill Schwarz. "Stuart Hall obituary: Influential cultural theorist, campaigner and founding editor of the New Left Review." The Guardian (February 10, 2014)

In The Guardian: "Washington state to suspend death penalty by governor's moratorium: ‘There are too many flaws in this system,’ Governor Jay Inslee says as he announces stay on capital punishment."





Adams, Tim. "Jazz Fan, Hipster and a Leftwing Hero; The Remarkable Journey of Stuart Hall." The Observer (August 18, 2013)

Check out Glenn Greenwald's, Laura Poitras' and Jermey Scahill's new online publication The Intercept: here is the "about" description:

"The Intercept, a publication of First Look Media, was created by Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, and Jeremy Scahill. It has a two-fold mission: one short-term, the other long-term. Our short-term mission is to provide a platform to report on the documents previously provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Although we are still building our infrastructure and larger vision, we are launching now because we believe we have a vital obligation to this ongoing and evolving story, to these documents, and to the public. Our NSA coverage will be comprehensive, innovative and multi-faceted. We have a team of experienced editors and journalists devoted to the story. We will use all forms of digital media for our reporting. In addition, we will publish primary source documents on which our reporting is based. We will also invite outside experts with area knowledge to contribute to our reporting, and provide a platform for commentary and reader engagement. Our long-term mission is to produce fearless, adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues. The editorial independence of our journalists will be guaranteed. They will be encouraged to pursue their passions, cultivate a unique voice, and publish stories without regard to whom they might anger or alienate. We believe the prime value of journalism is its power to impose transparency, and thus accountability, on the most powerful governmental and corporate bodies, and our journalists will be provided the full resources and support required to do this. While our initial focus will be the critical work surrounding the NSA story, we are excited by the opportunity to grow with our readers into the broader and more comprehensive news outlet that the The Intercept will become.

Blackburn, Robin. "Stuart Hall, February 3rd, 1932-to February 10th, 2014: An Obituary." Verso Books (February 10, 2014)

Stu Johnson for WEKU podcasts an interview: "Mayoral Candidate Danny Mayer to Focus Beyond Downtown Lexington"

Stuart Hall (1932 - 2014)

Stuart Hall was a major part of my intellectual development and an exemplary role model as an educator. He will be missed, but more importantly, he will be remembered in the works/lives of those he inspired. This will be an ongoing archive of materials by/about Stuart Hall. I welcome suggestions of materials to include in this archive.


Adams, Tim. "Jazz Fan, Hipster and a Leftwing Hero; The Remarkable Journey of Stuart Hall." The Observer (August 18, 2013)

Blackburn, Robin. "Stuart Hall, February 3rd, 1932-to February 10th, 2014: An Obituary." Verso Books (February 10, 2014)

Hall, Stuart. "The Neoliberal Revolution." Soundings # 48 (Summer 2011): 9-28.

Morley, David and Bill Schwarz. "Stuart Hall obituary: Influential cultural theorist, campaigner and founding editor of the New Left Review." The Guardian (February 10, 2014)





Today We Fight Back

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Resources for February 5, 2014




The Louisville Courier-Journal shares this video clip: "Evolution vs. creationism | Bill Nye the Science Guy takes on Creation Museum founder"





McElwee, Sean and Abigail Salvatore. "New Atheism’s big mistake: Debating creationists solves nothing: Fundamentalism isn't really about the Bible; it's about politics. So attacking religion doesn't fix the problem." Salon (February 1, 2014)

"List of Edward Snowden's NSA Revelations." Peace Action Wisconsin (2014)

Seriously bummed to find out this was Smiley & West's last podcast, but it was a good retrospective of past shows and a great final interview with Noam Chomsky

Smells Like Human Spirit podcasts:

"Episode 122: Jenny Blake talks Life After College" - "Jenny Blake is a blogger, life coach, public speaker and author of ‘Life After College: The Complete Guide to Getting What You Want’. Jenny has been featured in the Wallstreet Journal, Forbes.com, and the US News and World Report (among other places) for her work that aims to help young people ‘wake up, live big and love the journey.’ In 2011, she decided to leave her job at Google after 5 years to move to New York City and pursue her passion of being an entrepreneur full-time. In this episode of the Smells Like Human Spirit Podcast, Jenny looks back on the hard work that led to her early professional success, her subsequent burnout in her mid-twenties, and ultimately the decision to leave Google and ‘go it alone’. Other topics of discussion include society’s obsession with wealth, the definition of success, and how college graduates can position themselves to pursue their true passion.

"Episode 123: The Good Fight, with Ben Wikler" - "Ben Wikler, host of ‘The Good Fight’, joins Guy Evans for Episode 123 of Smells Like Human Spirit. Ben has a long history of involvement in political activism, particularly with several very important online activist communities. Topics of discussion in this interview include his politically active upbringing, the blend of comedy and politics present in his work, and why ‘the corporation’ has become the dominant social institution of our age."

"Episode 127: John and Molly Knefel (Radio Dispatch) on Guantanamo Bay, Occupy’s Legacy, and more" - "John and Molly Knefel, the brother and sister duo that co-host Radio Dispatch, join Guy Evans for Episode 127 of the Smells Like Human Spirit Podcast. Originally from Iowa, John and Molly now reside in Brooklyn, NY and aim to cover the most important and under-reported stories of the day with their show, which has gained quite an impressive following since its inception in 2010. Topics of discussion in this episode include Guantanamo Bay, Occupy’s legacy, the juvenile justice system in the U.S., and much more."

Barrett, Paul M. "Academic Fraud for College Jocks Reaches Across the Country." Business Week (January 8, 2014)

Bonanno, Mike and Andrew Boyd. "Principle: The Real Action is Your Target’s Reaction." Beautiful Trouble (2014)