Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Democracy Now: After 20 Years of Filmmaking on US Injustices, Michael Moore Goes to the Source in Capitalism: A Love Story

After 20 Years of Filmmaking on US Injustices, Michael Moore Goes to the Source in Capitalism: A Love Story
Democracy Now



Beginning with the 1989 classic Roger & Me, the Academy Award-winning director Michael Moore says his films “come back to this central core concern, which is the economic system we have is unfair, it’s unjust, it’s not democratic.” With his new film, Capitalism: A Love Story, Moore tackles the financial system and the interchanging circles of Washington politicians and corporate managers that run it. Moore says, “I thought I’d just cut to the chase and propose that we deal with this economic system and try to restructure it in a way that benefits people and not the richest one percent.”

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6 comments:

Eric Schansberg said...

I just wish he'd named it "crony capitalism" or something to do with mercantilism or special interest politics. Hopefully, the film is more accurate than the title.

Thivai Abhor said...

why hope, check it out, unless your not interested in economic issues...

as for the name--remember, Moore is a satirist, so the title is completely accurate.

Eric Schansberg said...

I've seen a trailer and it's exclusively about politics and political economy. So, either the title is inaccurate or the trailer is misleading.

I enjoyed Sicko pretty well, so I might catch this one. And I'd probably concur with him on his assessment-- except that he probably isn't describing capitalism.

Thivai Abhor said...

Eric, you confirm be general belief in the detachment and ignorance of economists... as if economics (or capitalism) is ever separate from "politics"

Thanks I need a good laugh.

Eric Schansberg said...

you're the one who started to talk about "economic issues"! ;-)

sure, you can't fully separate them. but it's not helpful to conflate them either.

Thivai Abhor said...

Like I said, you have a poor understanding of economics (real-world, not academic) if you believe politics is ever separate from economics. I suppose you are also going to tell me we can be objective and should remove bias from our writings.