Thursday, March 11, 2010

ENG 102: The People Speak Pt. 2

Remember, your assignment is to develop a research project inspired from the documentary The People Speak and/or the book The Voices of the People's History of the United States



A People's History of the United States (on Google Books)

Watch more readings from the Voices of the People's History of the United States

Howard Zinn

Previous ENG 102 posts



Here is a list of the resources I'm going to be putting on reserve for you at the BCTC library circulation desk, in the HUM 220 section:

Crips and Bloods: Made in America



Mooney, James, ed. American Dissenters: Volume Two. Maplecrest, NY: Brandywine Press, 2005.

Includes chapters on:
Ida B. Wells-Barnett
Agrarianism
Henry George
Bill Haywood and the IWW
Thorstein Veblen
Emma Goldman
Upton Sinclair
Sinclair Lewis
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and the Port Huron Statement
Reflections on Power and Self-Righteousness
The Battle in Seattle
The Arrogance of Ownership

Ruane, Kevin. War and Revolution in Vietnam, 1930-1975. Bristol, PN: UCL Press, 1998.

Buchheit, Paul, ed. American Wars: Illusions and Realities. Atlanta, GA: Clarity Press, 2008.

McCarthy, Timothy Patrick and John McMillian, eds. The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition. NY: The New Press, 2003.

Also in regards to the documentary:

The Zinn Education Project

Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States: 1492 - Present. NY: Harper-Collins, 2003.

Howard Zinn on Democratic Education (Z Magazine)

Howard Zinn on Holy Wars (Democracy Now)

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Brooklyn, NY: Verso, 1996.

Loewen, James. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. NY: Touchstone, 2007.

Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Propaganda Model of the Media



and an ongoing archive of materials on Howard Zinn

6 comments:

Anton said...

In part 2 of The People Speak. I found myself interested in the part called ‘’Not in Our Son’s Name’’ it was about the parents of a young man that died in the September 11 World Trade Center attacks. They were saying things like they did not want the United States to go of to war and have more people on both sides die they did not want revenge because it would just cause more people more pain. The one thing that keeps coming back to me is what would they have done if the choice was theirs to make?
Zac

Mau said...

Mauricio Castellanos

My response will be directed to the theme of how the color people has been working hard versus the organizations of the white people thru the history and the years. The movements they had to do in order to be heard on the country they’ ve been living, yet discriminated by so long. The things and mannifestations that made history and were somewhat important to their “liberty”, since some people beleived to be better just because their status or skin. And the persons that made their voice count on this once silent topic, but know very well for the people. I’m planning to discuss how the gouvernement took acctions versus this manifestations and how they handled the persons that lead them. How the colored people made thru this horrible part of the history and mannaged to get the presidence on this country? They have been working hard, and making changes about how the people think about them. There is one or two thing that are generalized, but as any other humang being, of course. I will be talking too about how they expressed their opinion about important events on the history and how the leaders of some of them made their voice count(such as the Vietnam War). Now days, there is almost freedom on this country, there are some laws and things that allready exist, but does people respect each other even if the law say it so? We do have some discrepancy of laws from state to state, for example that on some states is legal to hield a gun if you have certain license, but on some others is very hard to even have one(not that you cant get it, though). The same applies with people. There is a lot of different persons and thoguhts around the country, from state to state, and we better be ready to face this bitter reallity, yet sort of most unfrequently every day.

wallowinsqualor said...

I have always been inspired by early anarchist movements and have been considering almost a continuation of my first paper. However I’m thinking of taking the broad concept I started with and focus in on the loss of humanity’s seemingly innate need to produce, build, and create goods with their hands and how industrialization and in turn civilization has taken that from us. I’m hoping to make connections with workers movements starting with the Luddite’s and continuing into the twentieth century with the International Workers of the World, the Haymarket martyrs and so on. Just the first idea I had though.

Anonymous said...

I am going to write by paper on the present war today. I will argue on the subject of whether we should be in Iraq and Afghanistan and if we have helped or caused more damage. I can use the parts of the movie “The People Speak” by Howard Zinn to relate to my topic about the war in the past such as; “There is no Good War” by Gene La Rocque and “War and Patriotism” by Emma Goldman. This paper will cover the type of history called silenced history because its history that we don’t hear about or that is not publicized or known.
Brittany Sehgal

dustman said...

The second part of "The People Speak" discussed a particular interesting subject, and that was the use of patriotism for the expanse of American imperialism. For example, if we look to the Spanish - American war of the late 19th century, what did we do after we gained terrirory from the Spanish, in particular, Cuba and the Philippenes; we didn't give them their independence like we should of have, we exploited them for our own benefit. And how did we do it? One simple slogan "Remember the Maine' and the next thing we know we defeat the Spanish and take the land that they had taken from the indiginous population and basically continue the same policy of explotation.As it was noted in the documentary, war is fought by the poor for the rich. It is rarely to the benefit of the poor that wars are fought, instead it is mostly for the monied, land owning, special interests. They prey upon and use the geniune patriotic sprit of the common man, and pervert it into something that becomes nothing more a vehicle for their mindless slogans and incessant progaganda. Look at the 2nd gulf war. Look at the lies and the manipulation of the media to promote the war. It was nothing more then one big fear baiting propaganda operation instituted not only by our government, but a willing and unquestioning media. In many ways our country is no different then the communist and fascist regimes of the 20th century with the constant promotion of unquestioning patriotism and the manipulation of media to promote a desired reaction from the public. Zinn is correct that wars are fought by the poor for the rich, always have and always will. Carrol Adams

Thivai Abhor said...

Chuck,

Multiple directions you could go in (even though I know you already have a good grasp of your subject):

worker's movements
anarchist collectives/theory/practices
Anti-Capitalism/Anti-Globalization movements

important thing though is to develop a strong focus for your argument