Thursday, January 27, 2005

The Scarecrow: Never Forget

The Scarecrow, at Comments From Left Field, on what we should remember about the horror of Auschwitz:

Never Forget

4 comments:

Deleted said...

Sam Smith wonders, how much do we really learn from evil?

Thivai Abhor said...

Does studying the past prepare us to understand the present?

Abu Ghraib Understood in the Context Of Past Events

Deleted said...

This is the most chilling part: In order to understand more fully the connection between bureaucracy and mass death, it will be necessary to return to the apatrides. They were the first modern Europeans who had become politically and legally superfluous and for whom the most “rational” way of dealing with them was ultimately murder. A majority of the apatrides had lost their political status by a process of bureaucratic definition, denationalization

Thivai Abhor said...

A warning from the past--that resonates deeply with our current political practices... also pair with Giorgio Agamben's "State of Exception" and Zizek's "Spectre of Ideology"--mixing with Fromm's understanding how humans develop a necrophiliac relationship with technology and Arendt's recognition of the banality of evil, mapping of the "origins of totalitarianism" and the broader "human condition" ...

The "Cunning of History" is a powerful, slim book that has only increased in importance--it speaks as a voice from the past about where the war on terror could lead.

I found my copy in a small antique store in the middle of a bunch of furniture--pure fate...