Friday, November 12, 2004

Chuck Baldwin: Is President Bush Ushering In The Mark Of The Beast?

Having read the bible front-to-back 6 times, I'm very familiar with the apocalyptic prophecies and I knew that someone would eventually ask this question.

Pastor Baldwin, who also ran as Vice-President for the Constitution Party, asks Is President Bush Ushering In The Mark Of The Beast?

7 comments:

lokigr said...

This argument has been done before about the evils of any kind of computer marking/tracking devices. While I am somewhat familiar with Revelations I don't think this theological discussion is particularly useful. The ethics of such a chip are much more complex. The possible benefits and dangers such chips compose are immense. Detailed medical information and tracking could obviously save many lives, but the specter of big brother does ominously hang over all such discourses. Also I wonder about setting up Bush as some form of anti-Christ, which I feel the article does indeed attempt, about approving this chip for chimp tests. There are better reasons out there if you feel the need to make the argument.

Michael Hawkins said...

While the article is brief and smacks of inuendo, it at least brings to light the "photographic negative" quality of GW's presence in power. Present one thing, do exactly the opposite in full view, then lie about it with coordinated support from corporate media.

I remember his reaction to the overwhelming desire by Christians of all faiths to win a Governor's reprieve for Karla Faye Tucker -- he laughed and joked about her predicament, as though he was receiving orgasmic pleasure from his power to end her life. This is an evil person, and for someone who professes a "strong Christian faith," he surely does act in an antithetical manner to Christ's teachings. He receives plenty of assistance from rightwing evangelical leaders like Robertson and Dobson, men with anti-feminine fascist views who derive sexual satisfaction from power just like GW does.

I think the Apocalyptic narrative is a self-fulfilling phenomenon that does not necessarily have to manifest, but the rest of the world must figure out a way to stem the tide of American empirialism before it's too late.

I'm reading Atwood's THE HANDMAID'S TALE right now, so this topic is very prescient for me. If you haven't read it yet, by all means find a used copy and sit down for a few hours in a coffee shop.

lokigr said...

A fellow graduate student mentioned I should read it. I'll have to borrow her copy.

Mad Mike said...

Sounds a very interesting book, I think I will be keeping an eye open for it. Thank you for the title.

Thivai Abhor said...

The Handmaid's Tale is a very disturbing work of fiction that doesn't seem as far out as it did when I first read it.

It was a dreary day as I walked down the steps to leave the university campus today and the rabid, fire and brimstone preacher was in the free-speech zone screaming at young college students going by that they are defilers and sinners. He once seemed pitiful, then his misogynistic comments made me mad (in a particularly nasty rant he called young women walking by sluts with no morals), now I wonder if he is becoming a clarion call of a further retrenchment of American society into fantasy land.

I admire belief and faith, but what is being touted as religious faith in the persona of George Bush and that street preacher, is nothing more than hatred of differance and the other--fear of the unknown and a desire to close the system. Some may say Bush reaches out to minorities and other faiths, but he isn't saying we will love you no matter what, he instead is insisting become like us or we will destroy you. This social homogeneity move could lead to stagnation and deformity............................. I sense something big coming from the pressure that is builoding up: who will be the parasites that will infect the system with disruptive ideas and turn the collective consciousness?

Thanks everyone for your comments.....

Melissa is teaching it in her "women and science fiction" course.

Thivai Abhor said...

Kosigr--you list Pacific Edge as your favorite book. Is that the book by Kim Stanley Robinson? Are you also a SF reader? What do you like about that book?

lokigr said...

Yes it is. I used to be a huge reader of science fiction, though my reading of it has trailed of somewhat over that last few years. The more I read for class, the less I seem to read for personal pleasure. What I liked about the book was that it seemed to be the first working utopian novel I had read. So many utopina novels read like distpopias, or just seem rife with ideological and practical problems. Only problem with Pacific Edge is it is at times vagu, and its means of revolution, through Attorneys and law, seems highly unlikely. The entreched power structure won't be the agent of change.