Monday, January 31, 2011

Juan Cole: "Egypt is a Praetorian Regime"

Juan Cole: "Egypt is a Praetorian Regime"
Democracy Now

Hundreds of thousands have taken to the streets across Egypt today in the fourth day [from friday] of unprecedented protests against the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak. We speak with University of Michigan professor of history Juan Cole. "The Arab world has seen, in the last three decades, a series of Arab nationalist regimes, relatively secular, which have become increasingly sclerotic," Cole says.

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan. His writes regularly about Middle East issues on his blog, Informed Comment ... His most recent book is Engaging the Muslim World.

To Listen to the Episode

Democracy Now: 1/31/11 Reports on Egyptian Uprising

Democracy Now!’s Sharif Abdel Kouddous Live from Egypt: The Rebellion Grows Stronger

Massive protests in Egypt have entered their seventh day as tens of thousands pack into Tahrir Square in Cairo. Protesters are vowing to stay in the streets until President Hosni Mubarak resigns. A general strike was called for today, and a "million man march" is being organized for Tuesday. We speak with Democracy Now! senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who is in Cairo. "This is a popular uprising across all segments of society," Kouddous says. "People are so fed up with Mubarak, it’s hard to describe. They curse him. They want him to step down. And they will not leave the streets of Cairo, the streets of Egypt, until he does."


Repression and Poverty Underpin the Uprising in Egypt

Recent events in Egypt could be an opportunity for the United States to support the people of Egypt, but no Obama administration official has recommended publicly that President Hosni Mubarak should step down. We speak with Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University, about the U.S.-backed Mubarak regime and the record inflation and poverty that underpin the ongoing protests. "In Egypt, from 2004 until the present, the government and its reforms were applauded in Washington by World Bank, the IMF and U.S. officials," Shehata says. "But what all of that masked was what was going on at the level of real people and ordinary lives." [includes rush transcript]


Made in the U.S.A.: Tear Gas, Tanks, Helicopters, Rifles and Fighter Planes in Egypt Funded and Built Largely by U.S. Defense Department and American Corporations

The United States has given billion dollars of military aid to Egypt over the last decades. Lockheed Martin, Boeing and General Electric have provided tanks, missiles, engines and more to the Hosni Mubarak regime. Following the massive popular uprising, U.S. foreign aid continues to flow to Egypt, although the Obama administration has placed the program under review. We speak with William Hartung, author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex, and Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University.


Leading Egyptian Feminist, Nawal El Saadawi: "Women and Girls are Beside Boys in the Streets"

Renowned feminist and human rights activist Nawal El Saadawi was a political prisoner and exiled from Egypt for years. Now she has returned to Cairo, and she joins us to discuss the role of women during the last seven days of unprecedented protests. "Women and girls are beside boys in the streets," El Saadawi says. "We are calling for justice, freedom and equality, and real democracy and a new constitution, no discrimination between men and women, no discrimination between Muslims and Christians, to change the system... and to have a real democracy."

Deepa Kumar: The Rise of Anti-Muslim Hate

The rise of anti-Muslim hate
By Deepa Kumar
International Socialist Review

FROM ATTACKS at mosques and mobilizations against proposed mosque sites, to physical attacks on Muslims and Koran burnings, racism in the United States against Muslims and Arabs has reached new heights in recent months.

At the center of this storm has been the proposal to build an Islamic community center called Cordoba House—recently renamed Park51—two blocks from “Ground Zero,” the site of the World Trade Center towers destroyed on September 11, 2001. What began as a fairly non-controversial project, and one moreover that had the support of Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other New York City politicians, turned into a grave affront to the victims of 9/11 within a matter of a few months.

The effort to brand the center as the “victory mosque” was led by far right-wing groups associated with the Tea Party movement. These forces along with sections of the Republican Party were so successful in setting the terms of debate that anywhere between 541 and 682 percent of Americans expressed opposition to the project at its proposed location.

The speed at which the campaign against the project was able to shift public opinion—in spite of the fact that the current building, the former site of a Burlington Coat Factory, has been used as a Muslim prayer center for two years, and is located two and a half long Manhattan blocks from the site of the Twin Towers, in a neighborhood which includes a strip club and an off-track betting office—is a strong indication of how politicians, the media, and popular culture have successfully demonized Muslims in the United States over the past several years.

Cordoba House: The beginnings

In 2009, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, who has served as a cleric in the downtown Manhattan area for over a quarter century, proposed the construction of a community center modeled on the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan and the 92nd Street Y. The goal of the center was to promote greater understanding of the Muslim community.
The name “Cordoba House” refers to the city of Cordoba in Spain, which during Europe’s “Dark Ages” was a leading cultural center of the Muslim empire that ruled the Iberian penninsula. Cordoba represented not only a high point of intellectual development, but also marked a period of peaceful co-existence among Muslims, Christians, and Jews.

Imam Rauf, who positions himself as a “moderate Muslim” (he gave training speeches for the FBI and the State Department after 9/11), envisioned a community center with recreation facilities like a swimming pool, basketball court, gym, a culinary school, art studios, a child care center, and badly needed prayer space for the Muslim community in downtown Manhattan. His vision was to enable people of all faiths to interact.

The project was so non-threatening that even Mayor Bloomberg gave his support to it, and when the controversy hit, defended it in a speech delivered on August 3 with the Statue of Liberty in the background.3 When the New York Times ran a front-page story in December 2009, the overall tone was positive. The Times quoted Feisal saying, “We want to push back against the extremists.”4 A mother of a 9/11 victim also publicly backed the Islamic center.5

The project was even applauded by right-wing Fox anchor Laura Ingraham. While Ingraham, in an interview with Cordoba House co-founder Daisy Khan in December 2009, could barely hold back her anti-Muslim prejudices, arguing that Muslim majority countries from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon are intolerant toward Christians, she nevertheless gave her support to Khan, saying, “I can’t find many people who really have a problem with it.… I like what you’re trying to do.”6

On May 6, 2010, the New York City Community Board voted unanimously to approve the project.

Enter Stop Islamization of America

As Salon reporter Justin Elliott has documented, the Cordoba House project did not begin to become controversial until May 2010.

In response to the Community Board’s decision, Pamela Geller, a right-wing blogger, posted an entry titled, “Monster Mosque Pushes Ahead in Shadow of World Trade Center Islamic Death and Destruction.” In it, she wrote, “This is Islamic domination and expansionism. The location is no accident. Just as Al-Aqsa was built on top of the Temple in Jerusalem.” The next day her group, Stop Islamization of America (SIOA), launched “Campaign Offensive: Stop the 911 Mosque!”7

Stop Islamization of America, premised on the notion that Muslims are conspiring to take over the United States, called a protest for May 29 against what Geller called the “911 Monster Mosque.”

Geller is a fan of far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders (and the feeling is mutual, given his glowing blurb for the book she co-authored on the Obama presidency), and an admirer of open fascists and street gangs such as the English Defense League that routinely attack Muslims and immigrants. She once claimed that Black South Africans were launching a “genocide” against whites.8 A staunch Zionist, in an Israeli column she calls the term “Palestinian” “fallacious,” and she exhorted Israelis to, “Stand loud and proud. Give up nothing. Turn over not a pebble. For every rocket fired, drop a MOAB. Take back Gaza. Secure Judea and Samaria.”9

Subsequently, the New York Post ran articles that extensively quoted Geller and her vitriolic rhetoric. One article claimed falsely that Cordoba House’s opening date was set for September 11, 2011. This was the moment, Elliott suggests, when this story spread like wildfire, gaining media attention not only on Fox and other conservative outlets, but also the mainstream media.

Socialism/Marxism: Peace and Conflict Studies Archive

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International Viewpoint ["International Viewpoint, the monthly English-language magazine of the Fourth International, is a window to radical alternatives world-wide, carrying reports, analysis and debates from all corners of the globe. Correspondents in over 50 countries report on popular struggles, and the debates that are shaping the left of tomorrow."]

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Liberation News ["The Party for Socialism and Liberation is a working-class party of leaders and activists from many different struggles, founded to promote the movement for revolutionary change. Capitalism—the system in which all wealth and power is held by a tiny group of billionaires and their state—is the source of the main problems confronting humanity today: imperialist war, poverty, exploitation, layoffs, unemployment, racism, sexism, lesbian/gay/bi/trans oppression, environmental destruction, mass imprisonment, unionbusting and more. We are fighting for socialism, a system where the wealth of society belongs to those who produce it—the workers—and is used in a planned and sustainable way for the benefit of all. In place of greed, domination and exploitation, we stand for solidarity, friendship and cooperation between all peoples. The Party for Socialism and Liberation seeks to bring together leaders and organizers from the many struggles taking place across the country. The most crucial requirement for membership is the dedication to undertake this most important and most necessary of all tasks—building a new revolutionary workers’ party in the heart of world imperialism. At the same time as we aim for revolution in this country, we stand for defense of the existing workers’ states, the national liberation movements, and for workers and oppressed people around the world. The magnitude of our tasks will be matched by our determination to win."]

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We Are Many ("There are so many voices and so many struggles scattered across the planet (and the internet). We are attempting to gather these voices "in unvanquishable number" into a site that can offer a platform and, we hope, inspiration for action. The obstacles activists face today, like those faced by workers and the oppressed in Shelley's day, are great. But our numbers are greater, and with solidarity and unity we can hope to begin to make changes in the systems we oppose. This site cannot be exhaustive, and that is not our intent. We are simply trying to offer a small sampling of the best radical audio and video sources we know of. We know that the internet provides vast opportunities to share information and ideas, but we do not believe that this can replace the real actions of real people. We encourage our visitors, friends, fellow-travelers, and comrades to take inspiration from the people included here into their own struggles for justice. The idea of this website first came from the annual Socialism conferences, packed with so many speakers and discussions and debates and our desire to share these discussions with others on a single platform. We had collected hundreds of talks and meetings over the years, but had never shared them in a coherent way. We hope you find this effort useful.")

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Paul le Blanc: What Do Socialists Say About Democracy?

What Do Socialists Say About Democracy?
by Paul le Blanc
International Socialist Review

...

There are additional realities that flow from this, and you don’t have to be a genius like Albert Einstein to figure out what they are. The fact remains, however, that Einstein did discuss the question in 1949 and expressed himself rather well, so let’s see what he had to say:

Private capital tends to become concentrated in few hands, partly because of competition among the capitalists, and partly because technological development and the increasing division of labor encourage the formation of larger units of production at the expense of smaller ones. The result of these developments is an oligarchy of private capital the enormous power of which cannot be effectively checked even by a democratically organized political society. This is true since the members of legislative bodies are selected by political parties, largely financed or otherwise influenced by private capitalists who, for all practical purposes, separate the electorate from the legislature. The consequence is that the representatives of the people do not in fact sufficiently protect the interests of the underprivileged sections of the population. Moreover, under existing conditions, private capitalists inevitably control, directly or indirectly, the main sources of information (press, radio, education). It is thus extremely difficult, and indeed in most cases quite impossible, for the individual citizen to come to objective conclusions and to make intelligent use of his political rights.16


More recently, Sheldon Wolin, Professor Emeritus of Political Theory at Princeton University, updated some of Einstein’s points. To understand what he says, you need to understand Greek—so I will now give you a Greek language lesson. We got the word “democracy” from the ancient Greeks—demokratia, derived from demos (the people) and kratia (rule). Sheldon Wolin says: “It is obvious that today—in the age of communication conglomerates, media pundits, television, public opinion surveys, and political consultants—the exercise of popular will, the expression of its voice, and the framing of its needs have been emptied of all promise of autonomy.” No kidding! Noting that “American politicians and publicists claim that theirs is the world’s greatest democracy,” Wolin tells us, instead (and remember, “demos” means “the people”): “The reality is a democracy without the demos as actor. The voice is that of a ventriloquist democracy.”17 That is, “we the people” seem to be expressing ourselves politically, but really what is being expressed comes from the wealthy elites and their minions who control the economy, the larger culture, the sources of information, the shaping of opinion, and the political process as a whole.

Many anarchists, quite understandably, denounce the very concept of democracy as a swindle that should be rejected by all honest revolutionaries. Marxists argue, however, that the swindle must be rejected—but democracy should be fought for. It does seem, however, that given the many ways in which the electoral process in the United States is stacked in favor of capitalism and capitalists, a case can be made, at least in the present time, for our efforts to be concentrated outside the electoral arena. Just as politics involves much, much more than elections and electoral parties, so the struggle for democracy—as the comments of Howard Zinn suggest—can often be pursued far more effectively in workplaces, in communities, in schools, in the streets, in the larger culture through non-electoral struggles, and creative work of various kinds. The key for us is to draw more and more people into pathways of thinking and pathways of action that go in the direction of questioning established authority and giving people a meaningful say about the realities and decisions affecting their lives. That is the opposite of how so-called democracy—focused on elections—actually works in our country. This comes through brilliantly in the description of the wonderful anarchist educator Paul Goodman regarding the U.S. political system in the early 1960s:

Concretely, our system of government at present comprises the military-industrial complex, the secret paramilitary agencies, the scientific war corporations, the blimps, the horses’ asses, the police, the administrative bureaucracy, the career diplomats, the lobbies, the corporations that contribute Party funds, the underwriters and real-estate promoters that batten on urban renewal, the official press and the official opposition press, the sounding-off and jockeying for the next election, the National Unity, etc., etc. All this machine is grinding along by the momentum of the power and profit motives and style long since built into it; it cannot make decisions of a kind radically different than it does. Even if an excellent man happens to be elected to office, he will find that it is no longer a possible instrument for social change on any major issues of war and peace and the way of life of the Americans.18


Elections can sometimes be used effectively by revolutionaries to reach out to masses of people with ideas, information, analyses, and proposals that challenge the established order. If elected, they may also find that—aside from proposing and voting for positive, if relatively modest, social reforms—they will also be able to use elected office to help inform, mobilize, and support their constituents in non-electoral mass struggles. But the insertion of revolutionaries into the existing capitalist state will not be sufficient to bring about the “true democracy” that Marx spoke of, because they would find themselves within political structures designed to maintain the existing power relations. They would not have the power to end capitalist oppression or to transform the capitalist state into a structure permitting actual “rule by the people.” Marx and Engels themselves came to the conclusion that it would not be possible for the working class simply to use the existing state—designed by our exploiters and oppressors—to create a new society. The workers would need to smash the oppressive apparatus in order to allow for a genuinely democratic rule, through their own movements and organizations, and through new and more democratic governmental structures.

It is possible that some revolutionaries might be elected before such revolutionary change restructures the state. But they can be effective in what they actually want to do only by working in tandem with broader social movements and with non-electoral struggles. These movements and struggles must be working to empower masses of people in our economy and society, and to put increasing pressure on all politicians and government figures, and also on capitalist owners and managers, to respond to the needs and the will of the workers, of the oppressed, and of the majority of the people. Remember C. L. R. James’s comment: “To the degree that the [working class] mobilizes itself and the great masses of the people, the socialist revolution is advanced. The [working class] mobilizes itself as a self-acting force through its own committees, unions, parties, and other organizations.” These are, potentially, the seeds of the workers’ democracy—germinating in the present—that will take root and grow, challenging and displacing the undemocratic and corrupted structures associated with the so-called bourgeois democracies.

Democracy and “communism”

Before we conclude, we need to look more closely, even if briefly, at a contradiction that seems to have arisen between the notion of democracy and the realities of what came to be known as Communism. Within the tradition of twentieth-century Communism, many (in sharp contrast to Marx) came to counterpose revolution and communism to democracy as such. This can’t be justified, but it needs to be explained. Lenin, Trotsky, and the Bolsheviks led a super-democratic upsurge of the laboring masses, resulting in the initial triumph of the Russian Revolution of 1917. Immediately afterward, Russia was overwhelmed by foreign military invasions, economic blockades, and a very bloody civil war nurtured by hostile foreign capitalist powers. In that horrific situation, a brutal one-party dictatorship was established to hold things together. The Bolsheviks (even comrades Lenin and Trotsky) came up with highly dubious theoretical justifications for the dictatorship, which caused Rosa Luxemburg—correctly—to sharply criticize them, even as she supported the Russian Revolution. The justifications they put forward were soon used as an ideological cover for the crystallization of a vicious bureaucratic tyranny propagated, in the name of “Communism,” by Joseph Stalin and others, ultimately miseducating millions of people throughout the world.19

Both Lenin and Trotsky, and also many others who were true to the revolutionary-democratic essence of the Bolshevik tradition, sought to push back this horrendous corruption of the Communist cause. But it was too late, and after the late 1920s such words as Communism, Marxism, and socialism became wrongly identified throughout the world with that horrendous, totalitarian, murderous corruption represented by the Stalin regime. The ideology and practices of Stalinism are close to being the opposite of classical Marxism.

To Read the Entire Essay

Sharif Abdel Kouddous: Live From Egypt -- The Rebellion Grows Stronger

[This is a report from Sunday, Democracy Now is providing live streaming of reports from Egypt. The UK Guardian is also providing some excellent live updates in the format of a streaming timeline: "Egypt protests - live updates"]

Live From Egypt: The Rebellion Grows Stronger
By Sharif Abdel Kouddous
Democracy Now

Cairo, Egypt—In the second day of defiance of a military curfew, more than 150,000 protesters packed into Tahrir Square Sunday to call on President Hosni Mubarak to step down. The mood was celebratory and victorious. For most, it was not a question of if, but when, Mubarak would leave.

Military tanks have been stationed at entrance points around the square with soldiers forming barricades across streets and alleyways. In another departure from ordinary Cairo life, people quickly formed orderly queues to get through the army checkpoints. Soldiers frisked people and checked their identification cards. One soldier said they were making sure no one with police or state security credentials could enter.

Reports are widespread that many of the looters in Cairo are, in fact, remnants of the police and state security forces that were forced into a full retreat during Friday’s mass street revolt. In addition, hundreds, perhaps thousands, of prisoners were released from prisons in Fayyoum and Tora. Many believe it’s all part of an organized campaign by the regime to create lawlessness in the city in a last gasp attempt to maintain its grip on power. The headline of Al-Masry Al-Youm today blared: "Conspiracy by Interior Ministry to Foment Chaos."

But those concerns largely evaporate inside Tahrir Square where a blossoming of mass public political expression is taking place. Never before during Mubarak’s reign have so many gathered in one place in popular protest. Tens of thousands of people clapped in unison and chanted slogans ranging from the serious and patriotic to humorous rhymes filled with biting wit. Many had spent the night in the square and scores planned to stay longer.

A helicopter hovered overhead and two military fighter jets made repeated flybys, coming in at a lower altitude each time until the noise became deafening. Whatever the intended message, the crowd was not intimidated. They cheered, held up victory signs and waved in defiance. After emerging victorious in Friday’s battle with the interior ministry’s forces, there is little that can quell the enthusiasm of the Egyptian people or their full-throated call for change.

Mubarak’s attempt to placate the mass uprising by naming two of his top party officials, Omar Suleiman, the country’s infamous intelligence chief, as his first Vice President and Ahmed Shafik, a former Air Force commander, as Prime Minister have been met with strong opposition amongst the protesters.

"Omar Suleiman is not an option. The people are chanting against him today," said Nazly Hussein, a 30 year-old protester in Tahrir. "People want to bring down the system...I don’t think anyone is going home until the president and everyone around him leaves."

Mohamed El Baradei–the Nobel Peace laureate and former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency–arrived in Tahrir Square today to address the crowds. Baradei’s reputation is beyond reproach and he commands respect amongst most Egyptians but many say he has lived outside of the country for too long and criticize him for not taking part in earlier street protests. Nevertheless, some are calling on him to be included in some type of transitional government.

The one unifying theme, however, remains Mubarak. Everyone wants him out and it is difficult to imagine what iota of support he holds in any segment of Egyptian society save for his very small inner circle. And so, the people wait. It turns out six days of revolt will not be enough to overturn thirty years in power. But patience is wearing thin.

One man who is sure Mubarak’s time is up is my uncle Mohamed Abd El Qudoos [Arabic is phonetic and the English spelling of our last name varies within the family]. A leading opposition protester, Mohamed is the head of the Freedom Committee in the Press Syndicate, which has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood. He has been arrested countless times over the years by police and state security forces for leading small-scale demonstrations. Last week he was arrested on Tuesday and then arrested again during Friday’s uprising. A picture of him being dragged away by plainclothes police was shown on international news outlets across the globe. He was eventually released and able to join Saturday’s protests. In Tahrir Square Sunday, dozens of people came to pay tribute to his struggle. They shook his hand, kissed him hello and took pictures with him.

"This is a dream come true," Mohamed said, sitting in the middle of the packed square in his standard attire: suit, flag and megaphone. "Remember when I would stand on the steps of the press syndicate to protest? I would stand alone. Now look at everyone. They are all here."

Sharif Abdel Kouddous is a senior producer for the radio/TV show Democracy Now.

Link

Cornel West on Charles Rangel, Bush & Kanye West, and Why Obama Administration "Seems to Have Very Little Concern for Poor People"

Cornel West on Charles Rangel, Bush & Kanye West, and Why Obama Admin "Seems to Have Very Little Concern for Poor People"
Democracy Now

Princeton University professor and author Cornel West join us to talk about Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) being censured for ethics violations, President George W. Bush saying the worst moment of his presidency was when Kanye West called him a racist, and President Obama’s policies toward the poor. "The Obama administration seems to have very little concern for poor people and their social misery," West said.

To Listen to the Episode

Friday, January 28, 2011

Stevie Wonder: I Was Made to Love Her

Timothy Karr: One U.S. Corporation's Role in Egypt's Brutal Crackdown

(via Literaghost)

One U.S. Corporation's Role in Egypt's Brutal Crackdown
by Timothy Karr
Huffington Post

The open Internet's role in popular uprising is now undisputed. Look no further than Egypt, where the Mubarak regime today reportedly shut down Internet and cell phone communications -- a troubling predictor of the fierce crackdown that has followed.

What's even more troubling is news that one American company is aiding Egypt's harsh response through sales of technology that makes this repression possible.

The Internet's favorite offspring -- Twitter, Facebook and YouTube -- are now heralded on CNN, BBC and Fox News as flag-bearers for a new era of citizen journalism and activism. (More and more these same news organizations have abandoned their own, more traditional means of newsgathering to troll social media for breaking information.)

But the open Internet's power cuts both ways: The tools that connect, organize and empower protesters can also be used to hunt them down.

Telecom Egypt, the nation's dominant phone and Internet service provider, is a state-run enterprise, which made it easy on Friday morning for authorities to pull the plug and plunge much of the nation into digital darkness.

Moreover, Egypt also has the ability to spy on Internet and cell phone users, by opening their communication packets and reading their contents. Iran used similar methods during the 2009 unrest to track, imprison and in some cases, "disappear" truckloads of cyber-dissidents.

The companies that profit from sales of this technology need to be held to a higher standard. One in particular is an American firm, Narus of Sunnyvale, Calif., which has sold Telecom Egypt "real-time traffic intelligence" equipment.

Narus, now owned by Boeing, was founded in 1997 by Israeli security experts to create and sell mass surveillance systems for governments and large corporate clients.

To Read the Rest of the Article

Henry Giroux: Howard Zinn, A Public Intellectual Who Mattered

[Howard Zinn died a year ago on January 27th. Giroux's essay below is a good testament to his continuing importance. Our remembrance from last year: "So long Howard Zinn. It’s been good to know ya"]


Howard Zinn, A Public Intellectual Who Mattered
by Henry Giroux
TruthOut

In 1977 I took my first job in higher education at Boston University. One reason I went there was because Howard Zinn was teaching there at the time. As a high school teacher, Howard's book, "Vietnam: the Logic of Withdrawal," published in 1968, had a profound effect on me. Not only was it infused with a passion and sense of commitment that I admired as a high school teacher and tried to internalize as part of my own pedagogy, but it captured something about the passion, sense of commitment and respect for solidarity that came out of Howard's working-class background. It offered me a language, history and politics that allowed me to engage critically and articulate my opposition to the war that was raging at the time.

I grew up in Providence, Rhode Island, and rarely met or read any working-class intellectuals. After reading James Baldwin, hearing William Kunstler and Stanley Aronowitz give talks, I caught a glimpse of what it meant to occupy such a fragile, contradictory and often scorned location. But reading Howard gave me the theoretical tools to understand more clearly how the mix of biography, cultural capital and class location could be finely honed into a viable and laudable politics.

Later, as I got to know Howard personally, I was able to fill in the details about his working-class background and his intellectual development. We had grown up in similar neighborhoods, shared a similar cultural capital and we both probably learned more from the streets than we had ever learned in formal schooling. There was something about Howard's fearlessness, his courage, his willingness to risk not just his academic position, but also his life, that marked him as special - untainted by the often corrupting privileges of class entitlement.

Before I arrived in Boston to begin teaching at Boston University, Howard was a mythic figure for me and I was anxious to meet him in real life. How I first encountered him was perfectly suited to the myth. While walking to my first class, as I was nearing the university, filled with the trepidation of teaching a classroom of students, I caught my first glimpse of Howard. He was standing on a box with a bullhorn in front of the Martin Luther King memorial giving a talk calling for opposition to Silber's attempt to undermine any democratic or progressive function of the university. The image so perfectly matched my own understanding of Howard that I remember thinking to myself, this has to be the perfect introduction to such a heroic figure.

Soon afterwards, I wrote him a note and rather sheepishly asked if we could meet. He got back to me in a day; we went out to lunch soon afterwards, and a friendship developed that lasted over 30 years. While teaching at Boston University, I often accompanied Howard when he went to high schools to talk about his published work or his plays. I sat in on many of his lectures and even taught one of his graduate courses. He loved talking to students and they were equally attracted to him. His pedagogy was dynamic, directive, focused, laced with humor and always open to dialog and interpretation. He was a magnificent teacher, who shredded all notions of the classroom as a place that was as uninteresting as it was often irrelevant to larger social concerns. He urged his students not just to learn from history, but to use it as a resource to sharpen their intellectual prowess and hone their civic responsibilities.

Howard refused to separate what he taught in the university classroom, or any forum for that matter, from the most important problems and issues facing the larger society. But he never demanded that students follow his own actions; he simply provided a model of what a combination of knowledge, teaching and social commitment meant. Central to Howard's pedagogy was the belief that teaching students how to critically understand a text or any other form of knowledge was not enough. They also had to engage such knowledge as part of a broader engagement with matters of civic agency and social responsibility. How they did that was up to them, but, most importantly, they had to link what they learned to a self-reflective understanding of their own responsibility as engaged individuals and social actors.

He offered students a range of options. He wasn't interested in molding students in the manner of Pygmalion, but in giving them the widest possible set of choices and knowledge necessary for them to view what they learned as an act of freedom and empowerment. There is a certain poetry in his pedagogical style and scholarship and it is captured in his belief that one can take a position without standing still. He captured this sentiment well in a comment he made in his autobiography, "You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train." He wrote:

From the start, my teaching was infused with my own history. I would try to be fair to other points of view, but I wanted more than 'objectivity'; I wanted students to leave my classes not just better informed, but more prepared to relinquish the safety of silence, more prepared to speak up, to act against injustice wherever they saw it. This, of course, was a recipe for trouble.


In fact, Howard was under constant attack by John Silber, then president of Boston University, because of his scholarship and teaching. One expression of that attack took the form of freezing Howard's salary for years.

To Read the Rest of the Essay

Van Jones: The Economic Injustice of Plastic

Yes Magazine

Global Voices: Egypt Protests 2011

Egypt Protests 2011
Global Voices

Inspired by the Tunisian uprising that overthrew longtime president Ben Ali, Egyptian citizens and activists organized mass protests on January 25 calling for economic reform and an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year rule. Expectations ran high, and so did public tension as thousands demonstrated in Cairo and other cities, as well as in front of Egyptian embassies abroad. On January 25, Twitter was blocked and mobile phones were cut off, but news of arrests and police repression still circulated online (hashtag #Jan25). Early on January 28, however, the Internet was widely cut off throughout Egypt, shortly before the day's protests were to begin.

At least two protesters and one security officer have died, and many more are reported injured by tear gas and in clashes with police.

January 25 is a public holiday in Egypt marking the anniversary of a 1952 incident when the Egyptian police stood by the people in resistance against the British occupation.

To Access the Archive of Citizen Media Reports, Photos and Videos

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Deerhunter: Desire Lines

Creative Screenwriting Magazine: Co-writer/Director Matteo Garrone and Co-writer Maurizio Braucci on Gomorrah

Gomorrah Q&A
Creative Screenwriting Magazine



Senior Editor Jeff Goldsmith interviews co-writer/director Matteo Garrone and co-writer Maurizio Braucci about Gomorrah

To Listen to the Interview

HUM 221: Anarchism

(Under Construction)

The Great Chain of Being (All the previous ideologies we have studied subscribed to "proper" hierarchies -- what challenge does anarchism provide to the notion of natural and/or god-given hierarchies)





Some introductions to contemporary Anarchism:

AK Press: What Do You Mean by "Anarchism." [More at AK Press and Revolution by the Book)

Crimethinc: Fighting For Our Lives -- An Anarchist Primer [More at Crimethinc]

Noam Chomsky: The Relevance of Anarcho-Syndicalism

Michael Benton: On Anarchism

HUM 221: Socialism Reading

(Under construction)

Probably the best site for researching Marxist histories, theories and concepts: Marxists Internet Archive

For an introduction to the wide range of actually existing socialist economics ignored in Nancy Love's chapter, check out the only magazine I am currently subscribing to Monthly Review

"The history of any country, presented as the history of a family, conceals fierce conflicts of interest (sometimes exploding, most often repressed) between conquerors and conquered, masters and slaves, capitalists and workers, dominators and dominated in race and sex. And in such a world of conflict, a world of victims and executioners, it is the job of thinking people, as Albert Camus suggested, not to be on the side of the executioners."

--Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States

"Which Side Are You On" by The Dropkick Murphys



The People Speak (2009 documentary commemorating Howard Zinn's landmark history book A People's History of the United States and its companion volume Voices of a People's History of the United States)

Bill Moyers states:

There's a long tradition in America of people power, and no one has done more to document it than the historian, Howard Zinn. Listen to this paragraph from his most famous book. Quote: "If democracy were to be given any meaning, if it were to go beyond the limits of capitalism and nationalism, this would not come, if history were any guide, from the top. It would come through citizen's movements, educating, organizing, agitating, striking, boycotting, demonstrating, threatening those in power with disruption of the stability they needed." This son of a working class family got a job in the Brooklyn shipyards and then flew as a bombardier during World War II. He went to NYU on the G.I. Bill, taught history at Spellman College in Atlanta, where he was first active in the Civil Rights movement, and then became a professor of political science at Boston University.

There, he and his students sought a more down-to-earth way of looking at American history. And when no book could provide it, Zinn decided to write one. Since his publication in 1980, "A People's History of the United States" has sold more than two million copies.




The British political philosopher Edmund Burke, cited as a major influence for conservatives and liberals, is revered for his attacks on The French Revolution. Socialists would make the case that he is willfully ignoring the historical violence that led to the revolution and is hypocritical in celebrating the "Glorious Revolution of 1688" as a more "civilized" means for addressing injustice. Here is Julien Bell at the 2010 Socialist Forum providing a different perspective on the cause and effects of The French Revolution:

Julien Bell's "A People's History of the French Revolution" (audio)

So the beginning question in the reading that Nancy S. Love throws out for us "Is Socialism dead?" What do you think? Why or why not?

Nancy S. Love provides us with an incomplete, awkward and hazy introduction to Socialism, but to be fair, and she remarks upon this, it is a vast history that is difficult to summarize in a small chapter. Unfortunately, she compounds the mess of a chapter by not updating it for the 2nd edition to cover Latin American socialist movements and other current resistance movements which would have given a different understanding of Socialism's potential and its current relevance for our times:

The Take (Canada/Argentina: Avi Lewis, 2004)


South of the Border (USA: Oliver Stone, 2009)
"There's a revolution underway in South America, but most of the world doesn't know it. Oliver Stone sets out on a road trip across five countries to explore the social and political movements as well as the mainstream media's misperception of South America while interviewing seven of its elected presidents. In casual conversations with Presidents Hugo Chavez (Venezuela), Evo Morales (Bolivia), Lula da Silva (Brazil), Cristina Kirchner (Argentina), as well as her husband and ex-President Nestor Kirchner, Fernando Lugo (Paraguay), Rafael Correa (Ecuador), and Raul Castro (Cuba), Stone gains unprecedented access and sheds new light upon the exciting transformations in the region."


Not to mention vibrant economic and environmental struggles in the global south:

Blue Gold: World Water Wars (USA: Sam Bozzo, 2008)
[Includes Bolivian resistance to colonialization/privatization of their water resources)


Crude (USA: Joe Berlinger, 2009)


The End of Poverty (USA: Philippe Diaz, 2008)


and increasingly in the USA

Inside Job (USA: Charles Ferguson, 2010)


The Americans for a long time have been providing the European world with the proof that the bourgeois republic is the republic of capitalist businessmen in which politics is business like any other.

--Friedrich Engels in a letter to an American friend in 1893

Creative Screenwriting Magazine: Joel & Ethan Coen - True Grit Q&A

Joel & Ethan Coen - True Grit Q&A
Creative Screenwriting Magazine



Senior Editor Jeff Goldsmith interviews co-writers and co-directors Joel and Ethan Coen about True Grit

To Listen to the Interview

Noam Chomsky: Activism, Anarchism and Power

Noam Chomsky -- Activism, Anarchism, and Power
Conversations with History

On this edition of Conversations with History, UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler is joined by linguist and political activist Noam Chomsky to discuss activism, anarchism and the role the United States plays in the world today.

To Watch the Conversation

Social Movements/Resistance: Peace and Conflict Studies Archive

[MB: actual histories, examinations of tactics, repression of SMs, activist/protest issues and other issues related to SMs]

Abu-Jamal, Mumia. "The United States Is Fast Becoming One of the Biggest Open-Air Prisons on Earth." Democracy Now (February 1, 2013)

Ali, Mostafa and Hani Shukrallah. "What Happened to the Egyptian Revolution?" We Are Many (June 2013)

Alperovitz, Gar. "America Beyond Capitalism." Unwelcome Guests #637 (January 5, 2013)

Ames, Mark. "How UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Brought Oppression Back To Greece's Universities." The Smirking Chimp (November 23, 2011)

"Anonymous and the global correction: A loosely organised group of hackers has been targeting oppressive regimes and has said this is just the beginning." Al Jazeera (February 16, 2011)

Attalah, Lina, Sharif Abdel Kouddous, and Chris Toensing. "Massacre in Cairo: Egypt on Brink After Worst Violence Since 2011 Revolution." Democracy Now (August 15, 2013)

Baggins, Brian. "The Black Panther Party." Marxist Internet Archive (Archive: 2002)

"Bahrain: Below the Radar." Listening Post (April 23, 2011)

Bailey, Kenneth. "Who Shall Occupy Make Demands Of?: The Modern Case of the One-Eyed Monster." Groundswell (November 4, 2011)

Balagune, Kazembe. "Imagine: Living In A Socialist U.S.A ." Law and Disorder (February 27, 2014)

"The Bamako Appeal." Monthly Review (February 13, 2006)

Barber, Johnny. "International Peace Day from Kabul, Afghanistan." ZNet (September 21, 2012)

Barghouti, Omar. Boycott Divestment Sanction Controversy At Brooklyn College" Law and Disorder (February 11, 2013)

Barlow, Maude, Richard Grossman and Thomas Linzey. "When Lawmaking Becomes Rebellion (Water Privatization, Democracy School and the Corporate State)." Unwelcome Guests #307 (May 21, 2006) ["A new populist alliance of long time environmental activists and rural folk in central Pennsylvania has grown out of a struggle to ban toxic agribusiness operations that have targeted the area as the next profit opportunity. This movement is taking a new approach that is spreading across America via a project of public education and organization called democracy schools, that are teaching direct action lawmaking to challenge corporate supremacy and to create rights under law for people and the land."]

Battaglia, Jeremie. "Casseroles (Quebec Student Street Protests) (May 24, 2012)

Bauer, Shane. "A Hunger Strike Against Solitary Confinement: Shane Bauer on Inhuman Prisons from California to Iran." Democracy Now (July 12, 2013)

Bello, Walden, Kevin Danaher and Njoki Njehu. "Report Back from A16 (The A16 IMF/World Bank Demonstrations in Washington, D.C.)." Unwelcome Guests (April 22, 2000)

Benjamin, Medea and Trevor Timm. "Drone Summit: Killing and Spying by Remote Control." Law and Disorder (July 9, 2012)

Benton, Michael Dean. "The Many Headed Hydra." Politics and Culture (2001)

---. "A nation starts to mobilize: Something’s happening here." North of Center (October 12, 2011)

---. "Occupy: One Year Later." North of Center (September 17, 2012)

"Black Panther Party in Their Own Words." Seeing Red Radio (May 29, 2008)

"The Black Power Mixtape–Danny Glover Discusses New Doc Featuring Rare Archival Footage of Angela Davis, Huey P. Newton, Stokely Carmichael." Democracy Now (January 24, 2011)

Boardman, William. "San Diego's Circus Trial." Reader Supported News (July 3, 2013)

Boggs, Grace Lee. "Becoming Detroit: Grace Lee Boggs on Reimagining Work, Food, and Community." On Being (July 18, 2013)

Bohdanova, Tetyana. "#EuroMaidan Medic Shot in Neck Lives to Tweet: 'I Am Alive!'” Global Voices (February 22, 2014)

Boykoff, Jules and Kristian Williams. "Police Power and the Suppression of Dissent." Writers Talking (February 24, 2009)

Brooks, Diane. "These Seattle Teachers Boycotted Standardized Testing - and Sparked a Nationwide Movement."Truthout (March 18, 2014)

Brown, Pamela. "Rolling Jubilee: Buying Up Distressed Debt, Occupy Offshoot Bails Out the People, Not the Banks." Democracy Now (November 15, 2012)

Buhle, Paul. "Mari Jo & Paul Buhle weigh in on the largest pro-labor mobilization in modern American history." Media Matters (January 15, 2012)

Butigan, Ken. "A May to Remember." Waging Nonviolence (May 3, 2012)

Calhoun, Craig and David Graeber. "The Democracy Project." The London School of Economics and Political Science." (April 30, 2013)

Canning, Doyle and Patrick Reinsborough. "Changing the Story: Story-Based Strategies for Direct Action Design." In the Middle of a Whirlwind (2008)

Carrion, Maria. "General Strike Sweeps Europe as Millions Reject Austerity as Solution to Economic Crisis." Democracy Now (November 14, 2012)

Chandler, Bill, et al. "Chokwe Lumumba: Remembering "America’s Most Revolutionary Mayor" Democracy Now (February 26, 2014)

"Chile Rising." Fault Lines (Documentary video posted on Youtube: January 2, 2012)

Chiu, Joanna. "SlutWalk: Does The Media Make the Message?" WIMNs Voices (May 26, 2011)

Chomsky, Noam. "Direct Action, Occupy and the Power of Social Movements." Rochester Red and Black (April 16, 2013)

---. "The Occupy Movement to the Arab Spring." On Point (June 11, 2012)

---. "Occupy Wall Street "Has Created Something That Didn’t Really Exist" in U.S. — Solidarity." Democracy Now (May 14, 2012)

---. "Palestinian Hunger Strike a Protest Against "Violations of Elementary Human Rights." Democracy Now (May 14, 2012)

---. “This is the Most Remarkable Regional Uprising that I Can Remember” Democracy Now (February 2, 2011)

Chomsky, Noam, et al. "Occupy 2.0 (Peer Produced Politics)." Unwelcome Guests (March 10, 2012)

Claiborne, Shane. A Monastic Revolution On Being (July 1, 2010)

"Clashes rage in Cairo for fourth day: Protesters battled police forces for the fourth consecutive day demanding an immediate end to military rule." The Real News (February 6, 2012)

Clausen, Amy. "Women and Skepticism" The F Word (December 17, 2009)

Clumpner, Graham and Suraia Suhar. "U.S. Army Vets Join With Afghans For Peace to Lead Antiwar March at Chicago NATO Summit." Democracy Now (May 21, 2012)

Cohen, Stephen. "A New Cold War? Ukraine Violence Escalates, Leaked Tape Suggests U.S. Was Plotting Coup." Democracy Now (February 20, 2014)

Cole, Jack and Ethan Nadelmann. "The Mission to End Prohibition." Making Contact ((November 4, 2009)

Coleman, Gabriella. "Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking." (February 18, 2013)

---. "Geeks are the New Guardians of Our Civil Liberties." MIT Technology Review (February 4, 2013)

---. "What It's Like to Participate in Anonymous' Actions." The Atlantic (December 10, 2010)

Coleman, Gabriella, Rich Fein and X. "Hacktivism’s Global Reach, From Targeting Scientology to Backing WikiLeaks and the Arab Spring." Democracy Now (August 16, 2011)

The Coming Insurrection Another World is Possible (Originally Published December 2008: this is a 4 part audio version available online).

"Consensus Decision Making (Direct Democracy @ Occupy Wall Street) (Video: November 2011)

Costa, Amanda Lin. "A Story of the Earth Liberation Front: An Interview With Documentarian Marshall Curry." Truthout (July 21, 2011)

Crawford, Jarmahl, Peniel Joseph and Isabel Wilkerson. "Stokely Carmichael and Black Power." Radio Open Source (March 6, 2014)

Crawshaw, Steve and John Jackson. "10 Everyday Acts of Resistance That Changed the World: Václav Havel called it 'the power of the powerless.' How regular people, from Denmark to Liberia, have stood up to power—and won." Yes! (April 1, 2011)

CrimethInc. Ex-Workers Collective ["Greetings, dissident. History is not something that happens to people—it is the activity of people. In every moment, in every decision and gesture, we make our culture, our life stories, our world, whether we take responsibility for this ourselves or ascribe this power to executives, politicians, pop stars, economic systems, or deities. In a society which glorifies their power and our passivity, all thought which challenges this passivity is thoughtcrime. Crimethink is the transgression without which freedom and self-determination are impossible—it is the skeleton key that unlocks the prisons of our age. CrimethInc. is the black market where we trade in this precious contraband. Here, the secret worlds of shoplifters, rioters, dropouts, deserters, adulterers, vandals, daydreamers—that is to say, of all of us, in those moments when, wanting more, we indulge in little revolts—converge to form gateways to new worlds where theft, cheating, warfare, boredom, and so on are simply obsolete. This webpage is one of many manifestations of the underground network through which we work to realize these daydreams, to take the reins of our lives and make our history rather than using the same energy to insist we are being made by it. If you have illicit ideas and intentions of your own to share, you're invited to join us here."]

"Communiqué from an Absent Future." We Want Everything (September 24, 2009)

Crespo, Glenn and Larry Hildes. "Inside the Army Spy Ring & Attempted Entrapment of Peace Activists, Iraq Vets, Anarchists." Democracy Now (February 25, 2014)

Crowmwell, David and David Edwards. "Snowden, Surveillance And The Secret State." Media Lens (June 28, 2013)
,br /> Cuellar, Claudia, Phil Donahue and Tomas Young. "Dying Iraq War Veteran Tomas Young Explains Decision to End His Life." Democracy Now (March 21, 2013)

Curry, Marshall, Andrew Stepanian, and Will Potter. "“If a Tree Falls”: New Documentary on Daniel McGowan, Earth Liberation Front and Green Scare." Democracy Now (June 21, 2011)

D, Davey. "On the 10th Anniversary of the Iraq War We Recall key Anti-War Hip Hop Songs." Davey D's Hip Hop Corner (March 19, 2013)

Datta, Deblina, et al. "Guard Us All? Immigrant Women and the HPV Vaccine." Making Contact (July 29, 2009)

The Debt Resistors' Operations Manual. (A Project of Strike Debt and Occupy Wall Street, 2012)

"Declaration of the Occupation of New York City." New York General Assembly (September 30, 2011)

Eidelson, Josh. "Largest fast food strike ever today: 58 cities will be affected ." Salon (August 29, 2013)

El-Fattah, Alaa Abd. "Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah on Prison & Regime’s 'War on a Whole Generation.'" (March 31, 2014)

el-Shafei, Omar. "Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi Ousted Following Days of Massive Largest Anti-Government Protest" Law and Disorder (July 8, 2013)

Finkelstein, Norman. "Norman Finkelstein on What Gandhi Says About Nonviolence, Resistance and Courage." Democracy Now (June 5, 2012)

"Disguised Member of Hacktivist Group "Anonymous" Defends Retaliatory Action Against BART." Democracy Now (August 16, 2011)

"Fighting in the New Terrain: What's Changed Since the 20th Century." CrimethInc. (2010)

Finkelstein, Norman. "On the Role of BDS & Why Obama Doesn’t Believe His Own Words on Israel-Palestine." Democracy Now (June 4, 2012)

---. "Waning Jewish American Support for Israel Boosts Chances for Middle East Peace." Democracy Now (June 4, 2012)

Flowers, Margaret and Raymond Offenheiser. "Occupy G8: Peoples’ Summit Confronts World Leaders at Camp David, Urging Action on Poverty, Hunger." Democracy Now (May 18, 2012)

Ford, Matt. "A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design." The Atlantic (February 21, 2014)

France, David and Peter Staley. "How to Survive a Plague": As ACT UP Turns 25, New Film Chronicles History of AIDS Activism in U.S." Democracy Now (March 23, 2012)

Franklin, Sarah. "Transbiology: A Feminist Cultural Account of Being After IVF." Scholar and Feminist Online 9.1/9.2 (Fall 2010 - Spring 2011)

Freedom Riders (USA: Stanley Nelson, 2012: 117 mins)

"The Freedom Riders: New Documentary Recounts Historic 1961 Effort to Challenge Segregated Bus System in the Deep South." Democracy Now (February 1, 2010)

"Global Days of Rage." Democracy Now (October 17, 2011)

Goodman, Amy, et al. "Poisoned Water, Fossil Fuels." Making Contact (May 22, 2012)

Goodman, Amy and Chris Hedges. "A Discussion About Occupy Wall St." The Charlie Rose Show (November 3, 2011)

Gosztola, Kevin and Dorian Warren. "Occupy Wall Street Emerges as “First Populist Movement” on the Left Since the 1930s." Democracy Now (October 10, 2011)

Graeber, David. "Concerning the Violent Peace-Police: An Open Letter to Chris Hedges." N + 1 (February 9, 2012)

---. "Occupy and anarchism's gift of democracy." (November 15, 2011)

---. "Occupy Wall Street's anarchist roots: The 'Occupy' movement is one of several in American history to be based on anarchist principles." Al Jazeera (November 30, 2011)

---. "A Practical Utopian's Guide to the Coming Collapse." The Baffler #22 (2013)

Green, James. "Death in the Haymarket." We Are Many (June 17, 2010)

Greenwald, Glenn. "Glenn Greenwald Speaks Out on Edward Snowden and the NSA Revelations." We Are Many (June 2013)

Greenwald, Robert. "Koch Brothers Exposed: The 1% at its Very Worst." Uprising Radio (March 27, 2012)

"Guide to Anti-War Websites." Guardian (2010)

Hanarahan, Noelle and Stephen Vittoria. "'Long Distance Revolutionary': Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Journey from Black Panthers to Prison Journalist." Democracy Now (February 1, 2013)

Haney, Bill and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. "The Fight over Coal Mining is a “Fight About Democracy”: New Documentary with Robert Kennedy, Jr. Chronicles Campaign to Halt Mountaintop Removal." Democracy Now (May 23, 2011)

Harvey, David. "Urban Uprisings from Occupy Wall Street to the Paris Commune." Democracy Now (April 30, 2012)

Hedges, Chris. "The Death of Truth." TruthDig (May 5, 2013)

"Empire of Illusion and the Occupy Wall Street Movement." Mic Check Radio (January 20, 2012)

---. "A Master Class in Occupation." TruthDig (October 31, 2011)

---. "The Unsilenced Voice of a Long Distance Revolutionary." TruthDig (December 9, 2012)

---. "War is Betrayal: Persistent Myths of Combat." Boston Review (July/August 2012)

Hermes, Kris. "White-washing Human Rights Abuses and Suppressing a Popular Revolution." Law and Disorder (July 8, 2013)

Hiltermann, Joost. "Bahrain: A New Sectarian Conflict?" The New York Review of Books (May 8, 2012)

Hjersted, Tim. The Top 10 Films that Explain Why Occupy Wall St. Exists." Films For Action (December 13, 2011)

Horvat, Srećko and Igor Štiks. "Welcome to the Desert of Transition!: Post-Socialism, the European Union, and a New Left in the Balkans." Monthly Review (March 1, 2012)

Huerta, Delores and Jose Antonio Orozco. "The Non-Violent Path of Cesar Chavez." Making Contact (April 9, 2014)

Huff, Mickey. "Project "Censored 2012": Moving Beyond Media Reform." TruthOut (September 7, 2011)

I Love Mountains Day 2011 (4 minute film: Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, 2011)

International Viewpoint ["International Viewpoint, the monthly English-language magazine of the Fourth International, is a window to radical alternatives world-wide, carrying reports, analysis and debates from all corners of the globe. Correspondents in over 50 countries report on popular struggles, and the debates that are shaping the left of tomorrow."]

"Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement (CCI)." Bill Moyers Journal (April 30, 2010)

Jeffries, Sheila and Meghan Murphy. "Wher Have All of the Radicals Gone? When Feminism Gets Moderate." The F Word (April 15, 2011)

Jobs with Justice ["Jobs with Justice engages workers and allies in campaigns to win justice in workplaces and in communities where working families live. JwJ was founded in 1987 with the vision of lifting up workers’ rights struggles as part of a larger campaign for economic and social justice. We believe in long-term multi-issue coalition building , grassroots base-building and organizing and strategic militant action as the foundation for building a grassroots movement, and we believe that by engaging a broad community of allies, we can win bigger victories. We reach working people through the organizations that represent them—unions, congregations, community organizations—and directly as JwJ activists. Nearly 100,000 people have signed the Jobs with Justice pledge to Be There at least five times a year for someone else’s struggle as well as their own. In more than 40 cities in 25 states across the country, we are building coalitions of labor, religious, student and community organizations that are committed to each other for the long haul. Our campaigns make a difference for workers facing hostile bosses, knowing they are not alone in their struggle. At JwJ, solidarity is a two-way street: when communities come out for unions, they can expect unions to come out for them. Union victories are crucial, but they are not enough. We must maintain a strong commitment that our coalitions will weigh in on community fights. In 2009, local coalitions worked on a total of 111 workplace justice campaigns affecting more than 135,000 workers. Jobs with Justice coalitions supported approximately 46,000 workers in 56 organizing and first contract campaigns, and helped more than 10,000 workers at 17 workplaces win union recognition or first union contracts. Jobs with Justice coalitions worked on 130 community campaigns on issues like health care, immigrants’ rights, global justice, accountable development, state minimum wage increases, and sweat-free ordinances. JwJ coalitions were the primary coordinators for 70% of these campaigns."]

Jones, William P. and Gary Younge. "50 Years Later, the Untold History of the March on Washington & MLK’s Most Famous Speech." Democracy Now (August 21, 2013)

Jordan-Young, Rebecca. "Introduction to 'Critical Conceptions: Technology, Justice and the Global Reproductive Market.'" Scholar and Feminist Online 9.1/9.2 (Fall 2010/Spring 2011)

Jourdan, Brandon. "Egyptian Winter: A New Short Documentary." Global Uprising (March 4, 2013) ["Two years after the revolution in Egypt began, unrest continues across the country as the political and economic situation worsens. As the current government consolidates its power, the demands of the revolution may seem further away than ever. Still the revolution has opened up new spaces for political action, spurring public debate on issues that have gone unacknowledged and unresolved for too long. This short documentary looks at some of the reasons motivating revolutionaries to keep taking the streets, the obstacles that they are facing, and the tactics that they are using. It looks into the current economic and political problems facing Egyptians, the growing independent union movement, black bloc tactics, and the response of women to sexual assaults.]"

---. "New Documentary: Bosnia and Herzegovina in Spring." Global Uprisings (March 21, 2014) ["This short documentary tells the story of the uprising in Bosnia and Herzegovina that started in early February 2014. Since February 5 2014, protests have swept across Bosnia and Herzegovina. The protests were started by workers from five factories in northern city of Tuzla: Dita, Polihem, Poliolhem, GUMARA and Konjuh. The factories had been privatized, bankrupted and stripped of assets, leaving the workers with large debts, no salaries, no health care and no benefits. The protests culminated on February 7, 2014 when several governmental buildings were set on fire in cities across the country, including the presidential building in Sarajevo. Under pressure of protests, four regional governments resigned. The protests were followed with mass popular assemblies, referred to as plenums, that quickly spread across the country."]

Katsiaficas, George. "1968, 40 Years Later: Student, Worker Protests Sweep France, Leaving Indelible Mark on the Country and the World. Democracy Now (May 14, 2008)

---. The Subversion of Politics: European Autonomous Social Movements and the Decolonization of Everyday Life. (AK Press, 2006)

Khamvongsa, Channapha, Thoummy Silaphan and Manixia Thor. "40 Years After Secret U.S. War in Laos Ended, Millions of Unexploded Bomblets Keep Killing Laotians." Democracy Now (April 4, 2013)

King, Martin Luther, Jr. "Letter From a Birmingham Jail." African Studies Center of University of Pennsylvania (April 16, 1963)

---. "The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Presidential Address: August 16, 1967." Hartford Web Publishing (Also known as "Where Do We Go From Here" speech)

Klein, Naomi. "Sandy’s Devastation Opens Space for Action on Climate Change and Progressive Reform." (November 15, 2012)

Krul, Matthijs. "Mandela and Socialism." The Northstar (December 9, 2013)

Kruzynski, Anna and Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois. "Maple Spring: Nearly 1,000 Arrested as Mass Quebec Student Strike Passes 100th Day." Democracy Now (May 25, 2012)

La Greca, Jesse, et al. "Introducing Occupy Educated (Video: November 23, 2011)

Lapham, Lewis. "Crowd Control." Lapham's Quarterly (Spring 2014)

Levine, Bruce. "Psychiatry’s Oppression of Young Anarchists — and the Underground Resistance." Mad in America (June 16, 2013)

LGBT Pride Parades The Big Picture (July 8, 2011)

Leonard, Sarah. "Occupy Wall St. and the Downfall of the Smartest Guys in the Room." Bookforum (November 8, 2011)

Lepore, Jill. "Tea Party Time ... and the Death of Compassion." Open Source (October 14, 2010)

Levitin, Michael. "Europe Faces a Multi-National General Strike Against Austerity." Time World (November 13, 2012)

Lewis, John. "John Lewis Marches On." Moyers & Company (July 26, 2013)

Lindorff, Dave. "FBI Ignored Deadly Threat to Occupiers." Counterpunch (December 28, 2012)

Linebaugh, Peter and Marcus Rediker. The Many Headed Hydra: The Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000.

Louv, Jason. "Watch a Jaw-Dropping Visualization of Every Protest Since 1979." Ultraculture (August 23, 2013)

Ludlow, Peter. "Hacktivists as Gadflies." The Stone (April 13, 2013)

---. "Jailed Journalist Barrett Brown Faces 105 Years For Reporting on Hacked Private Intelligence Firms." Democracy Now (July 11, 2013)

Luna, Diego. "Diego Luna on His Directorial Debut, Cesar Chavez." Uprising Radio (March 24, 2014)

Maher, Stephen. "The Political Economy of the Egyptian Uprising." Monthly Review (November 1, 2011)

Marchman, Michael. "New Movements of Resistance, USA." The International Institute for Research and Education (2013)

Marks, Ben. "Trailing Angela Davis, from FBI Flyers to 'Radical Chic' Art." Collector's Weekly (July 3, 2013)

Meer, Haroon. "Lessons from Anonymous on cyberwar: A cyberwar is brewing, and Anonymous reprisal attacks on HBGary Federal shows how deep the war goes." Al Jazeera (March 10, 2011)

Merchant, Brian. "93 Harvard Faculty Members Call on the University to Divest from Fossil Fuels." Motherboard (April 10, 2014)

"Mike Ferner of Veterans for Peace and Zach Choate of Iraq Veterans Against War on the 8th anniverary of the invasion of Iraq." Raising Sand Radio (March 18, 2011)

Milstein, Cindy. "On Radicalism." Deep Green Philly (November 8, 2011)

Milstein, Cindy, et al. "Anarchism in Thought, and Anarchism in the Streets." Against the Grain (November 7, 2011)

Mitchell, Greg. "The Occupy USA Blog." The Nation (Daily blog on the events/reports of the Occupy movement)

Mitchell, Jerry and Dawn Porter. "Spies of Mississippi: New Film on the State-Sponsored Campaign to Defeat the Civil Rights Movement." and "PART 2: Interview with "Spies of Mississippi" Director and Reporter Jerry Mitchell." Democracy Now (February 25, 2014)

Moody, Chris. "How Republicans are being taught to talk about Occupy Wall Street." Yahoo News (December 1, 2011)

Morgan, Jason. "'The Troubles' in Northern Ireland." History for the Future (March 2, 2010)

Morris, David. "Where is Kropotkin When We Really Need Him? If you want to know what anarchism is and why we should care, read Kropotkin." Common Dreams (February 10, 2012)

"Mountain Mobilization shuts down largest mountaintop removal mine." RAMPS Media (July 28, 2012)

Murphy, David. "Taking On Monsanto's Massive Political Muscle." The Burt Cohen Show (February 2, 2012)

Ng, Brady. "Drowning out the peacemakers in Nanjing." Waging Nonviolence (March 11, 2013)

Noujaim, Jehane. "The Square: Jehane Noujaim’s New Film Captures Egypt’s Ongoing Revolution After Mubarak’s Fall." Democracy Now (January 25, 2014)

O'Brien, Danny. "We Beat Them to Lima: Opening a New Front Against Secret IP Treaties." Electronic Frontier Foundation (May 15, 2013)

Occupy! N + 1 (October 2011)

Occupy Wall Street [New York City: "OccupyWallSt.org is the unofficial de facto online resource for the ongoing protests happening on Wall Street. We are an affinity group committed to doing technical support work for resistance movements. We are not affiliated with Adbusters, anonymous or any other organization. Occupy Wall Street is a horizontally organized resistance movement employing the revolutionary Arab Spring tactic to restore democracy in America. We use a tool known as a "people's assembly" to facilitate collective decision making in an open, participatory and non-binding manner. We call ours the NYC General Assembly and we welcome people from all colors, genders and beliefs to attend our daily assemblies."]

"The Occupy Wall Street movement has ushered in a new dialectic of world revolt." Monthly Review 63.8 (January 2012)

"Odd Alliance of Anarchists, Farmers Takes on French Gov’t in Occupy-style Airport Battle." Earth First! Newswire (April 16, 2013)

Olsen, Scott. "U.S. Vet Who Nearly Lost Life at Occupy Protest, Brings Antiwar Message to NATO Summit." Democracy Now (May 21, 2012)

Olzen, Jake. "NATO’s crisis of legitimacy spreads in Chicago." Waging Nonviolence (May 7, 2012)

---. "Police Entrapment of Nonviolent Movements." Counterpunch (May 21, 2012)

Onesto, Li. "California's Pelican Bay Prison Hunger Strike: "We Are Human Beings!" Global Research (July 18, 2011)

Paalberg, Michael. "US unions' continued decline masks new forms of worker activism." The Guardian (January 25, 2013)

Poenaru, Florin. "To Make Sense of Ukraine, We Need to Bring the Class Back In." LeftEast (February 24, 2014)

Political Media Review ("Political Media Review (PMR), a project of the Transformative Studies Institute (TSI), is an independent reviewing clearinghouse for social justice media. As a not-for-profit and fully-volunteer organization, we are dedicated to promoting, publicizing and being a resource for social justice media by providing a space where social justice film and publication reviews can be accessed in a central location. PMR writes original reviews and collects already existing reviews of media. We have been in operation since January 2009.")

Potter, Will. "From Tim DeChristopher to Tar Sands Protests, the Environmental Movement Steps Up Civil Disobedience." Green is the New Red (September 2, 2011)

---. "Indiana Bill Would Make It Illegal to Expose Factory Farms, Clearcutting and Fracking." Green is the New Red (April 2, 2013)
---. "What is the "Green Scare." Green is the New Red (2011)

"Protests in Venezuela." Global Voices (Ongoing archive: 2014)

Ransby, Barbara. "Remembering the Overlooked Life of Eslanda Robeson, Wife of Civil Rights Legend Paul Robeson." Democracy Now (February 12, 2013)

Revolution by the Book (AK Press Blog/Oakland, CA: "The purpose ... is to inform people about anarchist publishing in general and AK Press in particular. We will post interviews with AK authors, reviews of and excerpts from AK books, and reports on the events at AK. We will also post news about other anarchist publishers and booksellers, translations, interviews with activists behind other projects, and lists of relevant conferences. We will use video and audio whenever possible."]

Right Here All Over: Occupy Wall Street Protests (Alex Mallis and Lily Henderson, 2011: 6 mins and 52 seconds)

"RNC Protests 1." Mic Check Radio (August 28, 2012)

Roos, Jerome. "Venezuela: it’s the opposition that’s anti-democratic." ROAR (February 21, 2014)

Rosenfeld, Seth. "A Secret History of America in the Sixties." Excerpt from Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012: 7-8.

---. "Spies in the Hill." Excerpt from Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012: 11-27.

---. "'Subversives': How the FBI Fought the 1960s Student Movement and Aided Reagan’s Rise to Power." (August 23, 2012)

Ross, Andrew. "Are Student Loans Immoral?" The Daily Beast (September 27, 2012)

Rothrock, Kevin. "Pro-Maidan Video Goes Viral Thanks to Pavel Durov, Russia's Zuckerberg." Global Voices (February 22, 2014)

Rowan, Harriet Blair. "Wisconsin’s Uprising: A Guided Tour of the 11-Day Protest Encampment Inside the State Capitol in Madison." Democracy Now (February 25, 2011)

Sandiumenge, Lili. "Spain: The Rebel Grandparents of the 15M." Global Voices (February 9, 2012)

Sauter, Molly. "The Visual Life of Occupy Wall Street." MIT Comparative Media Studies (February 2012)

Scagliotti, John. "Why Gay Marriage Matters: A Reply to Dean Spade and Craig Willse." Organizing Upgrades (September 12, 2013)

Schulman, Sarah. "AIDs and Gentrification." Against the Grain (November 20, 2012)

Schulte, Elizabeth. "Eugene Debs and American Socialism." We are Many (June 18, 2009)

Scott, William. "The People's Library of Occupy Wall Street Lives On." The Nation (December 12, 2011)

Seal, Kevin. "News of the Occupation: Occupiers Past and Present – Oakland Union of the Homeless." The Occupied Oakland Journal (November 17, 2011)

Sharp, Gene. "The Most Influential American Thinker on Non-Violent Struggle You’ve Never Heard Of." Uprising Radio (February 17, 2011)

Shelly, Deirdre. "XL Dissent: 398 Youth Arrested at Anti-Keystone XL Pipeline Protest at White House." Democracy Now (March 3, 2014)

Shingler, Benjamin. "Protesters finding creative ways around controversial new Quebec law." The Star (May 20, 2012)

Shiva, Vandana. "Everything I Need to Know I Learned in the Forest." AlterNet (December 10, 2012)

---. Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2000: 5-20.

Simons, Marco. "Supreme Court to Decide Whether U.S. Corporations Can Be Sued for Abuses Overseas." Democracy Now (February 24, 2012)

Sisk-Franco, Caleen. "The War Dance of the Winnemem Wintu." Making Contact (May 13, 2009)

Sitrin, Marina. "Ruptures in imagination: Horizontalism, autogestion and affective politics in Argentina." Policy & Practice (Autumn 2007)

Solnit, David and Rebecca Solnit. The Battle of the Story of the Battle of Seattle. Oakland, CA: AK Press, 2009.

Solnit, David and Ananda Tan. "The Battle of Seattle 10 Years Later: Organizers Reflect on 1999 Shutdown of WTO Talks and the Birth of a Movement." Democracy Now (November 30, 2009)

Solnit, Rebecca. "You Can Crush the Flowers, But You Can’t Stop the Spring." ZNET (November 23, 2011)

Sovyn, Olena. "#Euromaidan Protests Spread Throughout Ukraine After Explosion of Violence." Global Voices (February 20, 2014)

Spade, Dean and Craig Willse. "Marriage Will Never Set Us Free." Organizing Updgrade (September 3, 2013)

"Statement by Resist and Multiply in NYC: Beyond Wall Street." Gathering Forces (October 22, 2011)

Stewart, John, et al. "Let Your Life Be A Friction (To Stop The Machine)." Unwelcome Guests (March 3, 2012)

Stolar, Marty. "Jury Trial Begins for Occupy Wall Street’s Cecily McMillan" Law and Disorder (February 17, 2014)

Stryker, Deena. "Iceland's On-going Revolution." Daily Kos (August 1, 2011)

Sturr, Chris. "The legal situation and working conditions of farmworkers in New York state." Unwelcome Guests #8 (April 30, 2012)

"Supreme Court Upholds Healthcare Overhaul, Individual Mandate." Democracy Now (June 28, 2012)

Tabb, William K. "The Crisis: A View From Occupied America." The Monthly Review 64.4 (September 2012)

Taft, Jessica. "Growing Up and Rising Up: An Introduction." Rebel Girls: Youth Activism and Social Change Across the Americas New York University Press, 2010: 1-19.

Tate, Greg. "Fight for rights, will to power: The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975." Sight and Sound (December 2011)

Theoharis, Jeanne. "On Rosa Parks’ 100th Birthday, Recalling Her Rebellious Life Before and After the Montgomery Bus." Democracy Now (February 4, 2013)

Thompson, A.K. "Chris Hedges vs. CrimethInc. on Violence: Will We Get the Debate We Deserve?" Truthout (September 12, 2012)

Tomlinson, Jay. "Compilations of Media Clips of Reports on the Occupy Movement, Pts. 1-7." Best of the Left (September - November, 2011)

"Uprising in Egypt: A Two-Hour Special on the Revolt Against the U.S.-Backed Mubarak Regime." Democracy Now (February 5, 2011)

Varon, Jeremy. "Armed Struggle and the New Left." Against the Grain (September 28, 2011)

Venables, Robert. "Who Are These People?(The Onondaga Nation Encounters European Settlers)." Unwelcome Guests #302 (April 16, 2006)

Verheyden-Hilliard, Mara. "FBI Considers The Occupy Movement A Terrorist Threat: The State of Civil Rights and Public Policy." Law and Disorder Radio (January 7, 2013)

Walgrave, Stefaan, et al, eds. The World Says No To War: Demonstrations Against the War in Iraq. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010. [Available in BCTC Library DS79.767 P76 W67 2010]

Walker, Alice. "Celia Sánchez and the Cuban Revolution." Monthly Review (February 2, 2013)

---. "Palestine Conditions "More Brutal" Than in U.S. South of 50 Years Ago." Democracy Now (September 28, 2012)

Werbe, Peter. "Green Scare Crackdown and Monsanto Political Prisoner Marie Mason." Law and Disorder Radio (August 12, 2013)

West, Betsy. "Makers: Women Who Make America": New Film Chronicles Past 50 Years of Feminist Movement." Democracy Now (February 26, 2013)

White, Rob. "Interview with Göran Hugo Olsson." Film Quarterly (Winter 2011)

Wilder, Forrest. "Rick Perry's Army of God." Texas Observer (August 3, 2011)

Wilkerson, Isabel. "Isabel Wilkerson’s Leaderless March that Remade America." Open Source (October 12, 2010)

---. "The Warmth of Other Suns: Isabel Wilkerson on the Great Migration." Making Contact (February 25, 2014) ["Should they go or should they stay? That was a question millions of African Americans living in the South asked themselves in the 20th Century. For many the answer was simple. Life in the South was hard and dangerous, with lynching, Jim Crow laws, and lack of economic opportunities. From 1910 to the 1960s an estimated 6 million African Americans left the South and moved North, in what became known as 'The Great Migration.'"]

Williams, Lauren. "This Black, Gay, Badass Pacifist Mastermind of the March on Washington Is Finally Getting His Due." Mother Jones (August 27, 2013)

"Yemen Protests 2011." Global Voices (Ongoing Archive)

Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States: 1492 - The Present. History is a Weapon (Hosting the entire book)

Zirin, Dave. "Jason Collins: The Substance of Change." The Nation (April 30, 2013)

---. " Seeing 'New Jim Crow' Placards Seized by Police & More From the March on Washington." Portside (August 26, 2013)